The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.


Author Topic: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.  (Read 55265 times)

Rohan

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Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
« Reply #135 on: September 08, 2009, 11:56:51 AM »
A positive Venice Reviews : Note: Light Spolers



http://boxoffice.com/reviews/2009/09/the-road.php

« Last Edit: September 08, 2009, 11:59:32 AM by Rohan »

Rohan

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Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
« Reply #136 on: September 08, 2009, 12:10:15 PM »
I am sorry I had to post this review as well. Majority of the reviews and comments are coming positive. Only Variety so far gave it a negative review which I don't get why they are different than the rest of the critics. Again I don't know how Variety praised NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN.

Here we go one more review : SPOILER in the first paragraph. An Introduction for the characters, I would recommend to read it.

Just before the kid was born, the world burned. We don't know why, and the characters don't talk about it -- perhaps they don't quite know themselves, or maybe they've decided that it no longer matters. The Boy's universe is grey, full of ash, dust, and the ruins of a civilization he never saw. This is all he knows. His mother, seeing no point in going on, killed herself shortly after his birth. She was not alone. Many of those who didn't take their own lives were soon murdered by the desperate and hungry.

Skip ahead nine or ten years. The kid and his father wander the barren roadways heading south toward the coast for no clear reason other than that it gives them a tangible goal toward which to strive. (And there's always the hope that the ocean will be something other than gray.) Every day is a knock-down, drag-out fight for survival. They run, hide, starve, and fight off attackers who want their food, or their clothes, or, at one point, their flesh.

I set the stage like this not to horrify you or to gross you out, but to give you a sense of the relentless, pervasive grimness of The Road -- and then to turn around and say that The Road may be the most profoundly optimistic and life-affirming film you will see this year. Those who have read Cormac McCarthy's novel of the same name won't be surprised by this. John Hillcoat's faithful, near-perfect adaptation beautifully captures McCarthy's synthesis of all-encompassing darkness and enduring hope.


The father (Viggo Mortensen) and the son (Kodi Smit-McPhee) are driven -- kept alive, really -- by different things. For the Man, the Boy is all that matters. "The child is my warrant," he tells us in mournful voiceover. "And if he is not the word of God, then God never spoke."

What keeps the Boy going is the notion that, in a world of murderers and thieves, he and his dad are the Good Guys. They're "carrying the fire." When they pass friendly, desperate wanderers, the Boy pesters his father to donate some food. When dad decides to strip and abandon a man who tried to steal their possessions, the boy begs him to stop. It is here that McCarthy and Hillcoat begin to reveal their fundamentally positive view of human nature. The murderers and thieves are trying to recapture, by whatever means necessary, remnants of the world they used to know. The Boy is more or less a clean slate, and his empathy and kindness are instinctive, innate.

The Road is unremittingly focused on the Man and the Boy. This is not really an "apocalyptic thriller," though it has genre elements, and plenty of suspense. The father will do anything to protect his son, including putting a bullet in the Boy's brain if it comes to that. The Boy is the father's sole reason for carrying on, but the reverse is not true. It's really the Boy who's "carrying the fire." He is humanity, in every sense.

Viggo Mortensen is excellent here, but The Road is anchored by Kodi Smit-McPhee, whose performance is staggering in both its force and its surprising, artful understatement. I don't know how it's even possible to get a performance like this in a role this demanding and intense (he's in all but a few scenes) from an 11-year old boy -- who, by the way, is from Australia and is all the while doing a beautiful American accent. The 11-year olds I've known couldn't sit still for long enough to watch a movie, never mind make one. (An aside: Smit-McPhee was awesome during the post-screening Q&A, too, quickly improvising a charming answer to a rambling non-question from moderator Ken Burns.)

The ending, which brought me to tears, is not merely optimistic or hopeful -- it is uplifting, and the uplift is earned. The movie is a moving gesture of faith in our species. Doomsaying about the fate of mankind is as old as civilization: wrath of the Gods, nuclear war, global warming, what have you. The Road insists that we're going to be okay -- and I think I believe it.


marco

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Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
« Reply #137 on: September 09, 2009, 05:39:09 AM »
From what I heard,it seems that this movie was not appreciated in Venice.Let's see what happens..
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Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
« Reply #138 on: September 09, 2009, 04:13:44 PM »
It got pushed back again. This time to Thanksgiving.

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Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
« Reply #139 on: September 09, 2009, 06:37:13 PM »
I am getting pissed. Screw Weinstein. What's wrong with this people? Pushed to Nov 25th release now?


marco

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Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
« Reply #140 on: September 10, 2009, 08:18:10 AM »
I read somewhere that the reason why they're doing this is because of the negativity of the movie itself.I Don't know,it could be true,but I don't get why posticipating  ??? It doesn't make sense to me.
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Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
« Reply #141 on: September 10, 2009, 02:20:13 PM »
I don't think there will be any negative mark in the movie. What you read is probably what they are thinking. I read an article posted in the IMDB forums that the reason behind the Nov 25th release is that its currently playing in Film Festivals and also Weinsteins wants to get the movie closer to Oscars.





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Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
« Reply #142 on: September 11, 2009, 10:09:07 AM »

Rohan

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Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
« Reply #143 on: September 11, 2009, 11:27:40 AM »
AICN review. QUINT is IMPRESSED.

http://www.aintitcool.com/node/42272

Rohan

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Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
« Reply #144 on: September 13, 2009, 03:14:05 PM »
The Best Movies from Toronto Film Festival

Alex here, from the Toronto International Film Festival, getting ready to go to bed at 4am to wake up at 7am to go watch more movies and interview more people. But before I do, I wanted to share the top three films that I consider to be the best at the festival.

We will have the full reviews for these and many other movies from TIFF as soon as we get back. But for now, check out my picks below and feel free to ask any question that you may have.

* The Road: The film recently was pushed back for the third time to November 25th. Many fans have speculated that it must be trash since it keeps getting delayed. Not so. The reason for the new November date, is to get it ready for the awards season.

This is easily the best movie at the Toronto Film Festival and is not only well-made, but has some of the most disturbing scenes I have ever witnessed (people around me were covering their faces in horror). Viggo Mortensen's performance is definitely Oscar-worthy and so is John Hillcoat's directing. Do yourself a favor, see this movie as soon as it becomes available. And be ready to cry, scream and enjoy yourself.


Note : What happened to all the members, this forum looks dead.

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Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
« Reply #145 on: September 14, 2009, 12:55:45 AM »
I'm reading, just don't have anything worthwhile to say.
See the villain's larger eyes insinuating a just-off-normal perspective on how they see the world? I see signs Lucius Hunt; just not as you see dead people. I am so very happy we saw..each other, and no I will not tell you what color love is. Stop asking.

Rohan

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Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
« Reply #146 on: September 14, 2009, 11:55:37 AM »
I'm reading, just don't have anything worthwhile to say.

 ;D - what do you think of the reviews so far, Namaste?

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Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
« Reply #147 on: September 14, 2009, 08:52:52 PM »
New York Times Article Reports Some Bad Behavior by Bob Weinstein
Not much later, as it happened, a lesson in the bloody business of undoing myths played out in the mezzanine lobby of the Sutton Place hotel, where the press was gathering for a session about ?The Road,? from the Weinstein Company.

Full in front of six or seven reporters who were working near the festival press office, Bob Weinstein, the company?s co-founder, gave some very loud marching orders to Viggo Mortensen and others involved with ?The Road.? Tell the press to stop with this business of calling the movie ?long-delayed,? shouted Mr. Weinstein. ?Even the guys who like the movie say ?long-delayed ?Road,? ?bleak ?Road.?? It?s almost like it?s got to be stopped. Like, this is enough.?

Mr. Weinstein stopped to say a cheerful hello after the obscenity-laced pep talk. ?I?ve got 20 films coming up,? he said.

Rohan

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Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
« Reply #148 on: September 14, 2009, 08:55:33 PM »
[TIFF Review] The Road (8.5 out of 10)

What a long road it has been. The cinematic adaptation of the praised Cormac McCarthy novel certainly has hit many speed bumps. After a year long delay, it has finally arrived. Faithful to the novel, John Hillcoat has crafted an austerely dark look at the bleak voyage of a father and son. While this is the furthest from the feel-good film of the year one can get, Hillcoat?s take is approaching impeccable beauty. There are moments of sheer suspense, desperation, and pure heartache.

It is the not so distant future and humanity is nearly extinct. The film follows a father (Viggo Mortensen) and a son (Kodi Smit-McPhee) on a journey south to find hope. Their relationship is handled exquisitely throughout the film. There are also a few flashbacks with their mother (Charlize Theron). Her performance is a mixed bag, as her motivations are unknown and quite underdeveloped. John Hillcoat is the real star here. Through staggering visuals and a keen sense of when to push the boundaries, the film glides along with elegance. It goes to many dark, dismal places making me very curious on how this performs at the box office come Thanksgiving. There is barely a glimmer of hope for the entire two hours. One of the main highlights during the adventure is a supporting role by the barely recognizable Robert Duvall. His role is very small, but a specific scene with Mortensen?s character is one of the best of the film. The score by Nick Cave and Warren Ellis is astounding. From the mesmerizing introduction piano theme to the swelling end, the haunting score fuses with precision. The film is certainly not for everyone, but those who can handle the dreadfully dreary tale, will find something to love and contemplate with The Road.

8.5 out of 10

Rohan

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Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
« Reply #149 on: September 14, 2009, 09:00:36 PM »
Press Conference: Video. THE ROAD. TORONTO INTNL FILM FESTIVAL.

I know I am keep posting, but I am superly pumped up about this movie. I cannot wait.

http://www.vvcnetwork.ca/tiff09/20090913/20090913-theroad/