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The Lounge => Aspiring Filmmakers => Topic started by: MrStone on March 06, 2008, 12:55:49 AM

Title: Writer's Block
Post by: MrStone on March 06, 2008, 12:55:49 AM
How do you deal with it?

I'm really stuck.  I like the story I'm working on, but its closing in on a year and i'm really frustrated because there is a big gap in the story that I have to fill.

From shortly after the end of Act I - about 20 or 30 pages after to the beginning of Act III.  I AM LOST. AGHH.

Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Mr_Glass.1 on March 06, 2008, 09:02:39 AM
That's a hard one.  I will sometimes go to other people for ideas.  I also have a good friend look over what I have written and give me tips.  I listen to lots and lots of music, both regular and tons of soundtrack music, both looking over the script and not.  One other thing I do is just throw ideas out there, that's only if it's the first or second draft, just to try and find something.  I hope this helps.  ;)
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: mamasan on March 06, 2008, 11:07:40 AM
How do you deal with it?

I'm really stuck.  I like the story I'm working on, but its closing in on a year and i'm really frustrated because there is a big gap in the story that I have to fill.

From shortly after the end of Act I - about 20 or 30 pages after to the beginning of Act III.  I AM LOST. AGHH.



A friend of mine who writes teen books says she jots her potential scenes on index cards and, if she gets stuck, picks out a scene and forces herself to write it. So maybe you could write out possible scenes you'd like to see in the gap (or that need to be there) and then pick one and kind of have fun with it. You can always cut it later, but at least it would get you writing and thinking about how to fill the gap.
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Lifeordeath1 on March 06, 2008, 02:16:54 PM
Thats a good point there Mr. Stone!  I will have to try that sometime!  I would take that and run with it mamasan!  Sounds like good advice!  At least trying it wouldnt hurt ya know?  ;D
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Mr_Glass.1 on March 06, 2008, 09:12:06 PM
It was a good point.  Sometimes you just have to try to write something out, just slog thorugh it.
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: MrStone on March 06, 2008, 11:33:42 PM
It was a good point.  Sometimes you just have to try to write something out, just slog thorugh it.

Which worked a little last night.

I was about to post a two paragraph synopsis for someone to help me brainstorm - but as i was trying to organize it in readable terms - i noticed something.  It hit me like a ton of bricks "SHE HAS TO GO BACK!"  That's the only way the issue can be resolved.
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Mr_Glass.1 on March 07, 2008, 09:09:28 AM
Okay, this is a little weird, but last night I was able two write out two scenes, and I know exactly what's coming up next.
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: mamasan on March 07, 2008, 10:50:57 AM
Okay, this is a little weird, but last night I was able two write out two scenes, and I know exactly what's coming up next.

Why is that weird?
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: MrStone on March 08, 2008, 12:04:14 AM
Okay, this is a little weird, but last night I was able two write out two scenes, and I know exactly what's coming up next.

Why is that weird?

I guess because we all seemed to break thru the writer's block a little last night.
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Mr_Glass.1 on March 08, 2008, 11:04:21 AM
Yea, that's what I was thinking, now, on with the story.  Music is my greatest friend.
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: MrStone on March 08, 2008, 11:56:36 AM
Yea, that's what I was thinking, now, on with the story.  Music is my greatest friend.

I think Writer's Block on this story that I have now is recurrent.  I feel like I'm chasing a story, and as soon as I figure out one of the turns, i keep chasing.  I'm also trying to be inventive...and thats really difficult because it also seems like your standard murder-thriller, but its not..

so..anyway...

i'm hoping to submit to American Zoetrope competition in the fall.

Anyone else going to submit for competition?
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Lifeordeath1 on March 08, 2008, 08:10:41 PM
I agree with Mr. Glass music really helps me out!  Whatever mood I am looking to write I put "that" kind of music on, and it really does help.
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: MrStone on March 08, 2008, 09:54:26 PM
I agree with Mr. Glass music really helps me out!  Whatever mood I am looking to write I put "that" kind of music on, and it really does help.

music only puts me in the mood, and helps direct my writing when I'm not blocked.  Writing myself out of potholes and out of corners is what i'm dealing with now.

I heard the Coen brothers say in a Q&A that writing yourself into a corner is NOT a bad thing.  It forces you to be more creative to get yourself out.  Because if you write yourself into a corner and don't know how to get out, then likely your audience won't know how you're going to get out either. 

Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Lifeordeath1 on March 09, 2008, 11:26:46 AM
Thats a good point.  I took up some of the info about writing out ideas when your not sure what to do and it kind of helps.  Actually, this morning I was writing and was stuck, I had to make myself actually think about it.  Litterally.  Somtimes (with me at least) I just want to write and keep it moving without thinking about it.  I dont want to get stuck.  You have to make yourself, stop and just think. 

I hate going over pages I have already written, I go back and read the last few pages to get myself into a groove and a feel for the scene.  When I get back to where I was writting I kind of try to flow into it, but sometimes it doesnt work.  I then proceed to read the last few pages again if need be. 

I also act out my own writting.   ;D  Its kind of fun and get you a feel for the character, even its a girl, no Im not being wierd.

What exactly are you stuck on?  Is it dialogue?  What scene should come next?  Just trying to help out fellow writters block.   ;D
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: MrStone on March 09, 2008, 05:04:22 PM
speaking of acting out your script...i found a website called iscript.com where people actually act our parts of your script and record it..and email it back to you.  it's not free, but if you're willing to make the investment, it might be worth it.
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Lifeordeath1 on March 09, 2008, 06:47:00 PM
Thats very cool, and a very good idea, but why would I pay for someone to do that when I could get friends to do it for free.  I really do like the concept though!
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: MrStone on March 09, 2008, 11:03:32 PM
Thats very cool, and a very good idea, but why would I pay for someone to do that when I could get friends to do it for free.  I really do like the concept though!

I think they're semi-professional actors..not just friends.  I think if i was an established writer that I would use the service..however, locally, there is a stage actors group that will do it for playwrights and screenwriters.
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Mr_Glass.1 on March 10, 2008, 08:34:19 AM
Thanks for the infor MrStone.  8) I think that's interesting about writing yourself out of a writers block.  I should try it.  Lifeordeath1, I agree entirely, I have, I think, 38 movie soundtracks, and am still collecting, and depending on what I am writing, I'll put in a sad soundtrack, or one full of action music, or drama.  It just depends on what mood I need to be in.  Some people in my family dislike it, because it puts them in that mood too, but o well, that the price they will have to pay to have someone famous in their family.  ;D  Usually what I get stuck on most is the dialogue, I have to keep the story moving forward, but I want realistic dialogue, while still advancing the characters and not getting bogged down in too much conversation.  Any help?  ???
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Lifeordeath1 on March 10, 2008, 10:33:06 AM
In my opinion... less dialogue the better.  I have the book ScreenPlay: Writing the Picture and it states, "In a movie, most information can be conveyed without dialogue.  You should always try to show rather than tell.  There is a lot of cool stuff I could quote but it would take forever.  Oh wait one more thing...
Quote: "One student screenplay concerned some college kids who discovered that their weird professor has invented a time machine.  IN the first scene, at a bar, the students recounted the previous nights adventure, talking about how they broke into the profesors office and attempted to start the machine.  The prob. was that there was no need to express these events through dialogue.  Since this was the event that started the story, the answer was teh create an exciting scene in which the students crawled in the window, discovered the time machine, and tried to start it, letting the audience see the action rather than hearing about it."

This is self explanatory but its good to hear.
Its true, writing dialogue and making it seem real is difficult, its esp. hard reading your own dialogue that you just wrote.  Always have a dictionary or thesauras on you.  Again, if you can stay away from the dialogue, it would be better.  Try showing something instead of talking about it and see if you can work something out.  Experiment with it.  I hope I could be of some help, but Im not sure I answered your question.  What exactly are beging bogged down with in the dilogue?
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: MrStone on March 10, 2008, 10:10:26 PM
In my opinion... less dialogue the better.  I have the book ScreenPlay: Writing the Picture and it states, "In a movie, most information can be conveyed without dialogue.  You should always try to show rather than tell.  There is a lot of cool stuff I could quote but it would take forever.  Oh wait one more thing...
Quote: "One student screenplay concerned some college kids who discovered that their weird professor has invented a time machine.  IN the first scene, at a bar, the students recounted the previous nights adventure, talking about how they broke into the profesors office and attempted to start the machine.  The prob. was that there was no need to express these events through dialogue.  Since this was the event that started the story, the answer was teh create an exciting scene in which the students crawled in the window, discovered the time machine, and tried to start it, letting the audience see the action rather than hearing about it."

This is self explanatory but its good to hear.
Its true, writing dialogue and making it seem real is difficult, its esp. hard reading your own dialogue that you just wrote.  Always have a dictionary or thesauras on you.  Again, if you can stay away from the dialogue, it would be better.  Try showing something instead of talking about it and see if you can work something out.  Experiment with it.  I hope I could be of some help, but Im not sure I answered your question.  What exactly are beging bogged down with in the dilogue?

I've read more than my fair share of screenplay texts - i think people get too bogged down in making dialogue realistic. 

the illusion is that it appears realistic but really is not.

if anything, i would describe it as an efficient way of beating around the bush.  You don't directly say what's on people's minds.  The trick is to let the audience figure out what is meant, rather than telling them.

I'll copy and past a scene from my script where I attempted to do this.

Salters answers his phone, smiling toward Adam.

SALTERS
That didn't take long.

RACHEL
I needed an excuse.

SALTERS
For what?

RACHEL
How do you feel about your boss?

SALTERS
I know the feeling.

RACHEL
It's just she's so damn abrasive.

SALTERS
And that bothers you?

RACHEL
I don't like abrasive people.

SALTERS
Well, not many do, sweetheart.

RACHEL
And I don't like it when people do that either.

SALTERS
What?  Say sweetheart?

RACHEL
You don't know me enough to say that.

SALTERS
What?  Say sweetheart?

RACHEL
You don't know me enough to say that.

SALTERS
So.  Did you call me just to tell me that?  Or do you want to tell me what's really going on?

RACHEL
It doesn't seem like you know what's going on.

SALTERS
I know.  That's why I am asking you.

RACHEL
Well, I don't have the answers.

SALTERS
Where can I get them?

RACHEL
I have to go.

Dial tone.


(FYI, this in the first Act,..what I attempted to accomplish here was develop character without the individuals actually saying what was going on.  However, it can be seen what is going on...there is tension between the two...a love - hate relationship...and maybe some history with Rachel)

I don't know..that's what I've read and this is one of the examples I have.
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Mr_Glass.1 on March 11, 2008, 08:47:40 AM
Allright, thanks for the tip Lifeordeath1.  I'm getting bogged down in writing realistic dialogue.  Now, after reading MrStone's post, that helps a little.  One thing I do is know where I want to go with the scene, then reenact it talking out loud to myself to see how it sounds, if it sound to stilted I just try and talk normal, then write that down.
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Lifeordeath1 on March 11, 2008, 12:19:47 PM
Keep plugging away at it!  Eventually you will get it!  I think one of the problems is that we, at least me, are used to writing in blogs like this, or emails and we write wierd, speaking our point a few times.  Like have you ever noticed how people say goodbye more than once when hanging up the phone?  Its crazy!  "OK, well I will talk to you later, see ya, bye."  1,2,3 times the person said goodbye!  Next time you hang up listen to yourself or the other person, youll see what I am talking about.

In the movies, they hardly ever say goodbye.  There is no need to, we already know they are hanging up.  There is no need to repeat something the audience already knows.  Keep it simple, I guess that is my point after all that rambling. ;D
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: MrStone on March 11, 2008, 10:26:41 PM
Keep plugging away at it!  Eventually you will get it!  I think one of the problems is that we, at least me, are used to writing in blogs like this, or emails and we write wierd, speaking our point a few times.  Like have you ever noticed how people say goodbye more than once when hanging up the phone?  Its crazy!  "OK, well I will talk to you later, see ya, bye."  1,2,3 times the person said goodbye!  Next time you hang up listen to yourself or the other person, youll see what I am talking about.

In the movies, they hardly ever say goodbye.  There is no need to, we already know they are hanging up.  There is no need to repeat something the audience already knows.  Keep it simple, I guess that is my point after all that rambling. ;D
it's true.  i love movie dialogue..very efficient..i'd love to actually talk like that. ;)
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: MrStone on March 11, 2008, 10:33:00 PM
speaking of writer's block. i think talking to you guys about it helped me.  I was able to make it significantly to a new turning point.  i even have a shyamalan-esque revelation before act III.  I wanted it early because i didn't want the conclusion's only strength to be the twist - like con movies do...or some other shyamalan wannabe's try.
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Mr_Glass.1 on March 12, 2008, 08:29:41 AM
That's a good point Lifeordeath1.  That's great MrStone, I know this new section on the forum has been extremely helpful to me.
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Lifeordeath1 on March 12, 2008, 10:10:53 AM
Sweet Mr. Stone!  Its great that all of us could help, in some way, push you through your 3rd act!!!  This section has helped me out as well!  Now everytime I have an idea I write it down on a note card and read them later when I am stuck!  Usually I end up using them sooner or later!  YAHOO!

Ok, I know this may sound stupid, but I never really got the "ACT" thing.  Can you guys explain that to me?  Like the 1st, 2nd and 3rd acts, what exactly are they for?  What is their purpose?  Im sure its not difficult, but I could never figure it out.  I guess I could google it, but if you guys could tell me that would be great!  I know I should know this.   :o
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: MrStone on March 12, 2008, 12:33:34 PM
the points where the acts change are turning points.

end of act 1 - character has either by choice or being thrown into situation is on his mission. act 2 is the complications and should have a 2 turning points...the second being the gateway into act 3...whereas the hero knows what needs to happen to resolve the conflict. 

a little latr, i'll give better details when i'm not on phone.
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Lifeordeath1 on March 12, 2008, 05:51:25 PM
Sweet!  Yeah I kind of understand, but more examples would be helpful Thanks MR. Stone!
 ;D
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: MrStone on March 13, 2008, 12:14:27 AM
Sweet!  Yeah I kind of understand, but more examples would be helpful Thanks MR. Stone!
 ;D

Classic Example - Star Wars - A New Hope.

Act I
Luke's family is murdered, Luke decides to follow Ben Kenobi and to be come a Jedi like his father.  This opens him up to the whole new world of being a jedi - the adventure begins.
Act II - Complications
Their goal is to save the princess from the Death Star.  That's the first turning point.  Once this is accomplished, they escape, but now they have a new mission - to Destroy the death star.
Act III  - Conclusion
Luke joins in the epic battle to destroy the Death Star where ultimately he is the hero because of his new skills/abilities with the force.

(The thing with Lucas' work is that it's also very intertwined with joseph campbell's hero's journey...)

In my next post, I'll provide another example.
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: MrStone on March 13, 2008, 12:21:28 AM
The Matrix - through the 3 Act Structure.

Act I
Neo learns about the Matrix and makes a conscious choice to take the red pill. (Like I mentioned, turning points are often driven by choice).  This red pill opens up the new world to him.  He is extracted from the Matrix and brought to the real world.
Act II
Neo begins to learn about his new world, experience it.  His training is example to this.  The first goal is get him to the Oracle to find out if he is really the one.  On the way back, the complications begin because sypher betrayed them which causes Morpheus to be taken hostage.  Now, as the oracle stated, Neo must make a choice.  His life or Morpheus'.  (choice again to move into Act III)
Act III
Neo and Trinity re-enter the Matrix to save Morpheus. Then they try to exit, which leads to the conclusion where Neo fully realizes his existence as the one (by being killed).

Joseph campbell is again very intertwined with this story.

This is fun..i'm gonna keep going and post a few more.
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: MrStone on March 13, 2008, 12:29:31 AM
The Sixth Sense - through the 3 Act Structure.

Act I
Malcome is driven by his past failure to take on Cole as his client.  I believe Act I comes to a close when Malcome gives Cole a goal (to decided what he wants to get out of their meetings) - Cole decides not to be afraid.

Act II
Complications of Cole's problems - but malcome doesn't quite believe him.  Cole reveals his secret to Malcolm, but still malcolm doesn't believe him.  Malcolm decides he cannot help Cole either, but immediately realizes Cole is not crazy and is telling the truth.  The goal now is to help Cole help the ghosts.

Act III
Cole decides to start helping ghosts, in doing so, has found solace with himself, has begun to heal the relationship with his mother.  A Malcolm also gets help too. by realizing he's dead - he comes to grips with his reality and begins to let go.

(I'll admit the Three Act structure is sometimes hard to nail down on some stories.  this is because some writers are either a) so good it's subtle b) so good they can break the rules, or c) failed to clearly define the goal or situation.  Night doesn't have much trouble with that.

Act III
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Mr_Glass.1 on March 13, 2008, 08:41:24 AM
I like what you've been doing MrStone, it definately helps me to have clear defined acts. 
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Lifeordeath1 on March 13, 2008, 09:36:32 AM
AAHhhh  yes.  Thank you thank you thank you.  Your right, it is really hard to follow.  But I really think this will help!  Thanks for the work you put into writing it!   ;D
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Mr_Glass.1 on March 13, 2008, 07:11:02 PM
I think the advantage of acts, is that it helps you know where you are going, what you need to have happen, and how.
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: MrStone on March 13, 2008, 11:50:04 PM
I think the advantage of acts, is that it helps you know where you are going, what you need to have happen, and how.

Have any of your guys read "The hero of a thousand faces" by Joseph Campbell?  He basically points out how every great story in the history of mankind uses the same principles. He uses more as a discourse on human storytelling rather than teaching screenwriters how to write.

from this model - Lucas created star wars.
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Mr_Glass.1 on March 14, 2008, 08:31:50 AM
Hmm, I'll have to check that out. "There is no originality left in the world Mr. Heep.  That is the sad fact of life."
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Lifeordeath1 on March 14, 2008, 09:15:14 AM
Haha.  Yeah Mr. Stone sounds familiar but not, dont think I have have thanks!
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: MrStone on March 15, 2008, 03:47:20 PM
Hmm, I'll have to check that out. "There is no originality left in the world Mr. Heep.  That is the sad fact of life."

Originality was gone a hundred years ago. 

Even Solomon said that there is nothing new under the sun.
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Mr_Glass.1 on March 16, 2008, 04:02:27 PM
That's true, it appears the great MrStone  ;D has knowledge of the Bible.  So he's both knowledgable and a good scriptwriter.  ;D 8)
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: MrStone on March 16, 2008, 10:27:45 PM
That's true, it appears the great MrStone  ;D has knowledge of the Bible.  So he's both knowledgable and a good scriptwriter.  ;D 8)

good scriptwriter is probably a bit of an overstatement..i haven't sold anything...i'm in Arkansas...when i finish my script "sadistic", then i'll see how it flies in L.A.
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Mr_Glass.1 on March 17, 2008, 08:49:06 AM
That's cool, hope it flies well, and so you haven't sold a script yet, you still could have some good scripts written.
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: MrStone on March 17, 2008, 10:27:24 PM
That's cool, hope it flies well, and so you haven't sold a script yet, you still could have some good scripts written.

selling a script will be a bit of a gauge for me.
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Mr_Glass.1 on March 18, 2008, 08:54:30 AM
That's very true, maybe this one will sell.  Good luck.  By the way, how do you go about selling a script?  ???
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: MrStone on March 19, 2008, 12:10:37 AM
That's very true, maybe this one will sell.  Good luck.  By the way, how do you go about selling a script?  ???

...i have an idea..but..i think you have to get an agent to sell it for you...an agent who thinks they can sell it - so basically, i think you're suppose to submit til you get an agent who likes your work enough to actually try and sell it..

i've never actually done it, so i'm sure its much harder than it sounds.
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Mr_Glass.1 on March 19, 2008, 08:38:34 AM
Probably, but still, where there's life there's hope, best of luck when you submit it.
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: MrStone on March 20, 2008, 09:30:39 PM
..i played laziness at work today and wrote in my free time when the boss was out....i actually wrote the end of Act II and the entire Act III.  Guys and gals, i think i have a working outline.  But before i actually start the script, i'm going to go ahead and write a treatment.  so much for writer's block - i'll have to deal with it next time i run into it. 
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Mr_Glass.1 on March 21, 2008, 09:19:23 AM
That's great, cool, I'm glad you were able to get so much done.  I need to set aside time to just write.
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Lifeordeath1 on March 21, 2008, 01:33:44 PM
Nice!  To bad I have to much homework!  Im gettn the itch!
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Mr_Glass.1 on March 22, 2008, 06:09:39 PM
I know, I've got so much school to do right now, and work will start up soon.  O well, I'm going to get up earlier to write my script, that's what I've resolved.
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: MrStone on March 22, 2008, 06:15:02 PM
I know, I've got so much school to do right now, and work will start up soon.  O well, I'm going to get up earlier to write my script, that's what I've resolved.

you younguns are still in school?  wow.  I haven't been in school in about 3 years and that was graduate school.. ;)
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Mr_Glass.1 on March 22, 2008, 06:58:47 PM
12th grade.  Looking forward to two years of community college and work and then film school for two or three years.  I'll see how things turn out.
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: MrStone on March 22, 2008, 08:17:22 PM
12th grade.  Looking forward to two years of community college and work and then film school for two or three years.  I'll see how things turn out.

you're serious?

i'm 28 years old...
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: MrStone on March 22, 2008, 08:17:54 PM
12th grade.  Looking forward to two years of community college and work and then film school for two or three years.  I'll see how things turn out.

you're serious?

i'm 28 years old...

i'm just completely shocked..i figured you were late twenties to early thirties.
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Lifeordeath1 on March 23, 2008, 06:57:22 PM
Im 26.  Still in school, took the long route to figure out that custodial work sucked and that I really needed to do something with my life.  Im making it though!  Nothing but hard work from here on out!
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: MrStone on March 23, 2008, 09:04:14 PM
Im 26.  Still in school, took the long route to figure out that custodial work sucked and that I really needed to do something with my life.  Im making it though!  Nothing but hard work from here on out!

i found that writing is a great escape from reality.  even if i never sell - or make money, i will always dream, and always want to create stories.
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Mr_Glass.1 on March 24, 2008, 09:02:44 AM
Why are you that shocked that I'm in 12th grade MrStone? ???  You are older, which gives you a little more experience in life, which does lead to better writing.  Still, I think I'm doing pretty well.  Lifeordeath1, you wanted to be a custodian, weird, and kind of interesting, why?
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Lifeordeath1 on March 24, 2008, 01:42:32 PM
No, no, no.  I cant say that I ever wanted to be a custodian, its just that I hated school and didnt want anything to do with.  My mom said, "Well your getting a job!  Your not just going to sit around the house all day long thats for sure!"  So, needless to say I worked as a custodian at the same place for 7 freakn' years!  Crazy. 

I am very blessed to say that the people I worked with were much older than I, and they kept pushing me to go to college.  One guy esp, he was kind of like a grandfather to me and he never went to college and wish he had.  So here I am today!  I am actually, thought I would never say this, but... I am really enjoying school!  I feel like my brain isnt going to mush.  And the exciting thing is, is that this Fall I am out of Community College and into a real one, where I will take film production and my aunt has offered to pay for all my books and classes until I graduate!  Yeah!  I cant wait!   ;D ;D ;D 
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: MrStone on March 24, 2008, 10:26:56 PM
Why are you that shocked that I'm in 12th grade MrStone? ???  You are older, which gives you a little more experience in life, which does lead to better writing.  Still, I think I'm doing pretty well.  Lifeordeath1, you wanted to be a custodian, weird, and kind of interesting, why?

Because i guess your post count made it seem like you've been around longer, plus you don't really come across like a teenager...
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Mr_Glass.1 on March 25, 2008, 08:30:54 AM
Lifeordeath1, I get you now.  That's interesting, sounds like to didn't really like that job.  We definately need people to push us to be better and to keep going.  I know a couple people like that and they are a great help.  I hope I am able to enjoy college, I guess I'll have to wait and see.  What school are you planning on going to?  Do you want to be a producer?  I think that's great that your aunt is paying for all that, hope you do well.  MrStone, if you look at my profile I've only been a member since August, this is just about the only forum that I go to though, so that accounts for my high posts.  I guess that's a good thing that I don't come across as a teenager, at my church I'm usually able to interact well with the older people, which I like, because I learn more that way, understand more about life, which all helps my scriptwriting.
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Lifeordeath1 on March 25, 2008, 11:49:10 AM
Yeah, I am very grateful for all those people!  Yeah after about 4 years, I was freakn' done!  I over stayed that's for sure!  But at least i know what I really want to do now, never really cared before. 

Sometimes college gets rough, nothing but studying all the time.  Like right now I am swamped!  I have 1 more month and I hope it gets here soon!  Ugh!

I am planing on going to a school called WEBSTER.  If you want to do film production in Missouri this is the school to go to.  At least from what I am told.  I want to direct, write, camera operate.  I probably really dont need school for that stuff, but I think its really going to help me out a lot.  Just like at that dead end job I was at, those people helped me out.
I dont know about producing, I am more on the creative side of things, I love giving people direction on what I am looking for and how I need them to act a certain way.  Fun Stuff! 
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Mr_Glass.1 on March 26, 2008, 11:02:48 AM
I want to be a director and am planning on going to VCU (Virginia Commenwealth University), apparently it is one of the best public film schools around.  Plus, I would get in state tuition.  I can be really hard headed, which can be bad, but when it comes to school, it is incredibly useful because I just keep going.  Webster, I've never heard of that, I'll have to look it up. 
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Lifeordeath1 on March 26, 2008, 02:01:56 PM
There are quuite a few websters around, I think ours is the central one here in STL.  Hopefully VCU works out for you! ;D
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Mr_Glass.1 on March 26, 2008, 02:03:33 PM
So, is WEBSTER like a trade school, or what.  I also really hope VCU works out for me.  I know somebody in my church who went there, right now he is a second unit director, not for films, but for commericals, short videos, that kind of thing.
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Lifeordeath1 on March 26, 2008, 02:05:15 PM
No, Webster is a regular college.  I am going to have to go 3-4 years, so i cant wait to get my hands on all the "Free" euqiptment!
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Mr_Glass.1 on March 26, 2008, 02:06:10 PM
Right, that's cool.  Hope all works out well for you.  ;)
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Rohan on April 29, 2008, 02:04:44 PM
I am almost done with my script and going to finish the last scene and then I will be putting on the final draft. In the meantime, I am working on my query letter and synopsis. Already, in touch with a producer who already asked me to send it to her once I am done. I am excited and I am ready.

Rohan
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Erik on April 29, 2008, 02:16:39 PM
That's great!
I finished a first version of a script last week. The script is good, a nice Shyamalan-style ending (I couldn't resist :P) and a lot of action.
The only problem is that it's only 70 pages. I want to make that at least 90, maybe 100. After that I want to try to get it somewhere, I just don't know where.

What do you guys do after you finished a script? Do you just send it to a producer/director or something else?
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Rohan on April 29, 2008, 06:04:57 PM
That's great!
I finished a first version of a script last week. The script is good, a nice Shyamalan-style ending (I couldn't resist :P) and a lot of action.
The only problem is that it's only 70 pages. I want to make that at least 90, maybe 100. After that I want to try to get it somewhere, I just don't know where.

What do you guys do after you finished a script? Do you just send it to a producer/director or something else?

Erik an script should be alteast 102 to 120 pages long. Less than 100, I think studios won't accept it. After you are done with the script you should put it on final draft, copy right it or send to WGA writers guild. Then prepare a log line, query letter, synopsis. Every think should be done perfectly and its fun.

Rohan
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Mr_Glass.1 on April 30, 2008, 09:11:52 AM
Hey, thanks for the tips Rohan, I'm still in the first draft of my film, but still, if in the future I have questions I will go to you.  Hope all goes well with the script.
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Rohan on April 30, 2008, 11:39:30 AM
Hey, thanks for the tips Rohan, I'm still in the first draft of my film, but still, if in the future I have questions I will go to you.  Hope all goes well with the script.

Anytime, Mr.Glass.

Rohan
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Erik on April 30, 2008, 11:46:41 AM
Alright, thanks for your advise.
The Dutch law says that a songtext, poem or story is automatically copyrighted to the writer. As long as my script stays in Holland, it'll be fine. If I'm going to translate the script and send it to the US, it'll be a different thing.

Same thing as Mr_Glass, if I have any questions, I will ask them ;)
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Rohan on April 30, 2008, 02:58:38 PM
Alright, thanks for your advise.
The Dutch law says that a songtext, poem or story is automatically copyrighted to the writer. As long as my script stays in Holland, it'll be fine. If I'm going to translate the script and send it to the US, it'll be a different thing.

Same thing as Mr_Glass, if I have any questions, I will ask them ;)

I didn't knew that. WOW...  ???
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Mr_Glass.1 on May 01, 2008, 08:59:58 AM
Interesting law, not bad either.
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Kuzon on August 17, 2008, 02:43:47 AM
Listen to this...

http://www.amazon.com/Writers-Block-Peter-Bjorn-John/dp/B000FA58IE (http://www.amazon.com/Writers-Block-Peter-Bjorn-John/dp/B000FA58IE)
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Erik on August 17, 2008, 10:57:52 AM
Listen to this...

http://www.amazon.com/Writers-Block-Peter-Bjorn-John/dp/B000FA58IE (http://www.amazon.com/Writers-Block-Peter-Bjorn-John/dp/B000FA58IE)
Wow, that really contributes to the topic...
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Prince111 on September 01, 2008, 09:18:51 PM
Sometimes I'll walk away from it for about 2 or 3 months, so when I get back, it's almost like I'm have to get to know the characters and story just as if I was writing it for the first time.  Or I'll read classical plays, because almost everything in some form came from classical plays, by reading them or atleast go over their rules it'll help me out. 

There are some schools of thought that says that when you get a writers block that something in the material is not true to it self.  Either there's a character that shouldn't be there, or a plot devise or a scene (s) that's out of the theme of the material that you're writing.  With that in mind, I would go over your screenplay what in there that has, just HAS to be in there keep it, everything else, throw it away.  M. Night threw away 3 or 4 drafts of the Sixth Sense before things started to click.  These are things that have worked for me in the past.     
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Rohan on September 02, 2008, 08:08:54 PM
I take break. 2 or 3 weeks. Then I go back to my last scene and review it. If it makes sense I will leave it and if not I will come up with something new.

During the course of 2/3 week I study books/novel and watch movies of the same genre. Helps a lot.

Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: CandidEmphasis on January 11, 2009, 01:17:06 PM
Does anyone know how I can apply to become a PA on The Last Airbender when they film in Philadelphia?
Title: Re: Writer's Block
Post by: Erik on January 11, 2009, 02:29:35 PM
Send a letter of aplication to the production company?