MNightFans.com

The Lounge => Entertainment => Topic started by: Rohan on September 06, 2008, 01:09:33 PM

Title: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on September 06, 2008, 01:09:33 PM
I have been waiting for this movie over 6 months now. I saw a article online about it back then that Viggo Mortensen (One of my favs) will be making a new movie "The Road". The title is pretty cool. I started my own research. The movie is based on a novel by Cormac McCarthy, one of my all time favorite writers.

PLOT
A father and his son walk alone through burned America. Nothing moves in the ravaged landscape save the ash on the wind. It is cold enough to crack stones, and when the snow falls it is gray. The sky is dark. Their destination is the coast, although they don't know what, if anything, awaits them there. They have nothing; just a pistol to defend themselves against the lawless bands that stalk the road, the clothes they are wearing, a cart of scavenged food--and each other.

Director: John Hillcoat
Release: November 26,2008.
Website: http://www.theroad-movie.com

Since Mr.McCarthy is one of my favorite writers/novelists, I decided to buy the novel. I read the novel and honestly this guy have the gift of writing, ideas, discriptions and words. Its a powerful tale, serious message and shows us clearly the future of our planet. If we stay like this, we will be on  THE ROAD. I am not trying to scare anyone, but recommend this book. If you haven't read it yet, buy it, borrow it.

And if you are an inspiring screenwriter, this book is helpful. It shows how Mr.McCarthy brings his characters in the center of attention and how he describes his characters world. Really helpful.

If you want to see some picture of the movie, make sure go to imdb.com and type THE ROAD.

Rohan
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Namaste on September 06, 2008, 05:16:24 PM
sounds sort of like road warrior, lol  or the other mad max movies.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on September 06, 2008, 08:13:15 PM
sounds sort of like road warrior, lol  or the other mad max movies.

Have you read the book?
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: FoxxyMama on September 07, 2008, 12:09:45 PM
Oh my gosh I read the book too and I was waiting for a movie for so long!
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Namaste on September 07, 2008, 10:08:09 PM
nope, i havent read the book. does sound kinda interesting tho.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on September 08, 2008, 01:58:25 AM
Its a beautiful book. I a m glad its a movie now.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Mr_Glass.1 on September 09, 2008, 12:51:12 PM
I'll have to check it out when I get the chance.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on September 11, 2008, 12:20:56 PM
I'll have to check it out when I get the chance.

The book or the movie?
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Mr_Glass.1 on September 12, 2008, 12:41:52 PM
The book, and then I guess the movie.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on September 12, 2008, 07:43:36 PM
The book, and then I guess the movie.

I highly recommend the book. You will be happy that you are a script writer.

Rohan
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on October 04, 2008, 12:28:58 PM
NEW YORK TIMES.

At World?s End, Honing a Father-Son Dynamic

READ IT IF YOU'VE READ THE BOOK. SOME SPOILERS.  

ERIE, Pa. ? Cormac McCarthy?s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, ?The Road,? takes place in a world that, because of some unexplained catastrophe, has just about ended. The sky is gray, the rivers are black, and color is just a memory. The landscape is covered in ash, with soot falling perpetually from the air. The cities are blasted and abandoned. The roads are littered with corpses either charred or melted, their dreams, Mr. McCarthy writes, ?ensepulchred within their crozzled hearts.
 

Viggo Mortensen and Kodi Smit-McPhee as father and son in the film version of ?The Road.?

For the crew that has just finished filming the movie version of ?The Road? ? a joint production of 2929 and Bob Weinstein?s Dimension Films, set to open in November ? that meant an upending of the usual rules of making a movie on location. Bad weather was good and good weather bad. ?A little fog, a little drizzle ? those are the good days,? Mark Forker, the movie?s director of special effects, remarked one morning in late April while the crew was shooting some of the final scenes in the book on a stretch of scraggly duneland by the shore of Lake Erie here. ?Today is a bad day,? he added, shaking his head and squinting.

The sky was blue, the sun so bright that crew members were smearing on sunscreen. A breeze was carrying away the fog pumping feebly from a smoke machine. Even worse, green grass was sprouting everywhere, and there were buds on the trees. Some of the crew had hand-stripped a little sapling of greenery, but the rest of the job would have to be done electronically by Mr. Forker, who was also in charge of sky replacement.

?The Road? began filming in late February, mostly in and around Pittsburgh, with a later stop in New Orleans and a postproduction visit planned to Mount St. Helens. The producers chose Pennsylvania, one of them, Nick Wechsler, explained, because it?s one of the many states that give tax breaks and rebates to film companies and, not incidentally, because it offered such a pleasing array of post-apocalyptic scenery: deserted coalfields, run-down parts of Pittsburgh, windswept dunes. Chris Kennedy, the production designer, even discovered a burned-down amusement park in Lake Conneaut and an eight-mile stretch of abandoned freeway, complete with tunnel, ideal for filming the scene where the father and son who are the story?s main characters are stalked by a cannibalistic gang traveling by truck.

The director of ?The Road? is an Australian, John Hillcoat, best known for ?The Proposition,? and many crew members were Aussies as well. In conversation the ?Mad Max? movies, the Australian post-apocalyptic thrillers starring Mel Gibson, came up a lot, and not favorably. The team saw those movies, set in a world of futuristic bikers, as a sort of antimodel: a fanciful, imaginary version of the end of the world, not the grim, all-too-convincing one that Mr. McCarthy had depicted.

?What?s moving and shocking about McCarthy?s book is that it?s so believable,? Mr. Hillcoat said. ?So what we wanted is a kind of heightened realism, as opposed to the ?Mad Max? thing, which is all about high concept and spectacle. We?re trying to avoid the clich?s of apocalypse and make this more like a natural disaster.? He imagined the characters less as ?Mad Max?-ian freaks outfitted in outlandish biker wear, he added, than as homeless people. They wear scavenged, ill-fitting clothing and layers of plastic bags for insulation.

The script for ?The Road,? by Joe Penhall, is for the most part extremely faithful to Mr. McCarthy?s story of a father and son traveling alone through this blighted landscape and trying to keep alive the idea of goodness and civilization ? the fire, they call it. The script does enlarge and develop in flashback the role of the man?s wife (played by Charlize Theron), who disappears quite early from the novel, choosing suicide rather than what she imagines will be starvation or worse. And of course the script lacks Mr. McCarthy?s heightened, almost biblical narrative style.

Some of that could be suggested by the look of the film, Mr. Hillcoat said, but mostly the nature of the bond between the man and the son, who in the script, as in the book, speak to each other in brief, freighted moments, would have to come out in the performances.

Viggo Mortensen, who plays the father, said the same thing. ?It?s a love story that?s also an endurance contest,? he explained, and quickly added: ?I mean that in a positive way. They?re on this difficult journey, and the father is basically learning from the son. So if the father-son thing doesn?t work, then the movie doesn?t work. The rest of it wouldn?t matter. It would never be more than a pretty good movie. But with Kodi in it, it has a chance to be an extremely good movie, maybe even a great one.?

Kodi is Kodi Smit-McPhee, an 11-year-old Australian who plays the son and bowled everyone over when he tested for the part, greatly reducing the anxiety filmmakers feel when casting a child. Some of the crew privately referred to him as the Alien because of the uncanny, almost freakish way that on a moment?s notice he switched accents and turned himself from a child into a movie star. Days after the filming of a climactic, emotional scene, people on the set were still marveling at Kodi?s performance. A couple said they had puddled up just from watching the monitor and needed to sneak a tear-dabbing finger behind their sunglasses.

Times Topics: Cormac McCarthyIn the novel the father and son have a relationship that is both tender and businesslike; they?re trying to survive against great odds, after all, and there isn?t much time for small talk. Both on and off the set Mr. Mortensen and his co-star behaved much the same way. In Erie, while Kodi?s father was away for a bit, Mr. Mortensen, who has a grown son of his own, moved from his suite to Kodi?s room, a double, where they jumped on the beds together. During filming Mr. Mortensen, protective of Kodi, worried, for example, about yanking or dragging him too hard, but also treated him as an equal, a fellow professional who happened to have a very different way of working.

Once he emerged from his trailer, Mr. Mortensen more or less stayed in character all day ? bearded, gaunt, wound up and intense, going off by himself every now and then to smoke a cigarette. Kodi, on the other hand, wearing a ratty sweater, a wool cap and a pair of pants much too big for him, wandered around and hummed to himself between takes. He also engaged in lengthy fencing and stick-breaking contests with Jimi Johnson, a video assist operator.

For a scene in which the father, carrying the son on his shoulder, chases down a sandy road after a man who has stolen their belongings, Mr. Mortensen did wind sprints and jogged in place to make himself seem breathless and exhausted. Kodi simply turned limp on cue, and Mr. Mortensen snatched him up like a sack.

The next scene ? in which the father and son catch up to the thief, and the father forces the man to take off his clothes, leaving him naked and freezing ? took forever to set up. Like neighbors at a barn raising, the crew members erected a canopy over the road to cast an end-of-the-world shadow, and a while later, when the sun had moved, they had to reposition it. While waiting, Mr. Mortensen came back and fretfully studied the monitor. Kodi, meanwhile, dug for sand beetles, showing an especially plump one to Mr. Mortensen.

?Looks like good eatin?,? Mr. Mortensen said, and it wasn?t entirely clear whether he was joking or talking as a man who was supposed to be starving.

The thief was Michael Kenneth Williams (Omar on ?The Wire?), one of a string of brand-name actors who turn up briefly in the film. (Robert Duvall is an old, dying man, and Guy Pearce is another father wandering with his family.) Mr. Williams brilliantly improvised while taking off his rags and plastic bags, pleading for his life in a way that causes the boy to take his side. When the first take was over, even before a wardrobe assistant could get there, Mr. Mortensen rushed over to help Mr. Williams pick up his clothes and get dressed again.

?He?s a good actor,? Kodi said.

Mr. Mortensen said, ?Yeah, he?s good, isn?t he??

The rest of the day ticked by slowly, in a way that was a reminder that filmmaking may be the last vestige of 19th-century artisanal labor: hours and hours to capture what on screen would last just a few minutes. When Mr. Hillcoat called it a wrap, a weary Mr. Mortensen headed for the makeup trailer, where he served wine from a stash he kept there. A while later, his face scrubbed of grime, his cheeks flushed a little, Kodi gave Mr. Mortensen a hug before heading out. Mr. Mortensen kissed him on the forehead.

?It was hard to get a rhythm out there today because of the sun,? Mr. Mortensen said on the way back to his trailer, decorated with a Mets banner, a Montreal Canadiens jersey and the flag of the San Lorenzo soccer team of Argentina. ?But Kodi was unflappable, as usual. I don?t even think of him as a kid. There are things he?s done on this movie that I?ve never seen anybody do before. And there are many adult actors who never have a moment like he has every day. I can?t say I?ve ever worked with a better partner.?

He stopped to snatch a hamburger, no bun, from the catering table, and after wolfing half of it, he added: ?I think of Kodi as a friend. We?re kind of like an old married couple. That?s what our relationship is.?

--------------------------------------------------------------------

Awesome. I can't wait.



Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: shadowbender on October 05, 2008, 02:29:08 PM
Viggo Mortensen? Awesome! It sounds very interesting, almost like I Am Legend.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on October 06, 2008, 11:06:47 AM
Viggo Mortensen? Awesome! It sounds very interesting, almost like I Am Legend.

Yes. I AM LEGEND is awesome. I read THE ROAD novel. Its shocking and scary. If you've read it, you know what I am talking about.


Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on October 12, 2008, 06:57:52 PM
The official website. http://www.theroad-movie.com

Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Mr_Glass.1 on October 13, 2008, 02:40:23 PM
That looks really interesting, and something I've been waiting for a while for.  A post-apocalyptic movie where it focuses on how people react to what has gone on.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on October 13, 2008, 03:53:45 PM
That looks really interesting, and something I've been waiting for a while for.  A post-apocalyptic movie where it focuses on how people react to what has gone on.

Exactly. Same feeling here.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on October 13, 2008, 06:09:46 PM
I heard THE ROAD script is well close to the novel "The Road". There are some difficult scenes, I wonder how Hillcoat will shoot the scenes.

For example, the opening scene of the novel. The man wakes up and its pitch dark he wants to make sure that his son still sleeping next to him.

There is no dialogue. But we can hear the man breathing, described.

I was thinking we should a trailer soon.



Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on February 05, 2009, 11:38:18 PM
One of the most awaited movies of all time. I am waiting for this movie like a kid standing at his drive way waiting for the Ice Cream van. I recently found these new pictures and thought to share with everyone.

http://www.viggo-works.com/index.php?page=1442

The following are the words of a person who saw the cut of movie

...and it is killer good. There was still some tweaking being done, and it was pre-sound mix/final score/color correction but I was mesmerized. I am one of the 12 people who did not read the book so I had no idea what I was in for. It is some of the finest filmmaking I have seen, and I see everything. It was gut wrenching and brutal and harrowing and beautiful and left me an emotional puddle. Some of the images are tough to live with, but surprisingly and wonderfully, what I am left with weeks later is a profound sense of having enough, plenty, in fact way way more than enough. It?s scary times out there and I, like everyone else, am worried about retirement and providing for my family and basic survival. THE ROAD puts it into perspective ? there are moments of relief that are so simple as to be unnoticeable in our everyday lives, but in extreme situations (like the majority of the world?s population faces every day) those moments become examples of pure grace. A brief moment of shelter, the kindness of a mother, the companionship of a dog transcend all. And I have never seen as beautiful a portrayal of a father?s love for his son. See this movie, and be prepared to have your heart ripped open.

This book is very powerful. It questioned me many times. I pray to GOD everyday for the good sunny day and everyone around me. Its a habit of mine. I have been praying for years now, not cause I read the book. The book is really good, I strongly strongly recommend everyone here to read it.

Another person who saw The movie in an screening :

I recently saw a late-edit of The Road. The much anticipated book was one of the few I've ever bought before release. Even knowing what was going to happen I was transfixed with fascination--revolted and affirmed at the same time. The end brought me to tears. Even in a fairly raw state, i thought it was a great movie. Though I'll need to see it again on the big screen--and everyone will have to watch it--even if only once, It might be too emotionally exhausting to see more than once.

They're the users from IMDB and I thought to share their idea and feedback here with all of us.

One of my friends watch the special screening of the movie in New York. He immediately got back to me and couldn't stop himself praising the movie. The first thing I asked him is about the locations, cinetography and soundtrack. He stated that its all powerful even though there is some editing needs to be done, he was shocked and scared. Emotional and true tear jerker, he said. Now, I cannot wait for the movie. I also heard while ago about its soundtrack and background score is its absolute best.

The Road was supposed to be release on Nov of 2008, but they pushed it and there is no release date yet, except "Early 2009 Release".

Please Read : Left Behind an article for "THE ROAD"  - http://www.nytimes.com/2006/10/08/books/review/Kennedy.t.html?pagewanted=2&_r=2&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss

Rohan

Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Namaste on February 06, 2009, 12:57:05 AM
Cool..sounds like a good movie.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on February 06, 2009, 03:29:08 PM
Cool..sounds like a good movie.

Have you read the book?
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Namaste on February 06, 2009, 05:42:12 PM
Nope..would probably be good though. It seems a little hung up on conventional morals though..
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on February 06, 2009, 07:40:42 PM
Nope..would probably be good though. It seems a little hung up on conventional morals though..

While I was reading the book, some parts are stronger than the bible. Biblical book. How far one man can go to protect his own blood. I will not ruin it for you. When you read the book specially - it will make you ask questions from yourself
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: shadowbender on February 07, 2009, 09:24:17 PM
Yeah, I've seen "The Road" book a lot at stores. I really need to read the book.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on February 08, 2009, 04:11:42 PM
Yeah, I've seen "The Road" book a lot at stores. I really need to read the book.

I thought you already read the book.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: shadowbender on February 08, 2009, 04:42:08 PM
Yeah, I've seen "The Road" book a lot at stores. I really need to read the book.

I thought you already read the book.

No, I haven't read it. I did state earlier that it sounded interestig, but no, I've never read it.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on February 08, 2009, 05:24:28 PM
Yeah, I've seen "The Road" book a lot at stores. I really need to read the book.

I thought you already read the book.

No, I haven't read it. I did state earlier that it sounded interestig, but no, I've never read it.

Are you looking forward to the movie?
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: shadowbender on February 08, 2009, 05:32:07 PM
Yeah, I've seen "The Road" book a lot at stores. I really need to read the book.

I thought you already read the book.

No, I haven't read it. I did state earlier that it sounded interestig, but no, I've never read it.

Are you looking forward to the movie?

Oh yes. Definitely. Sounds like a very powerful and amazing movie.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on February 09, 2009, 12:52:20 PM
Yeah, I've seen "The Road" book a lot at stores. I really need to read the book.

I thought you already read the book.

No, I haven't read it. I did state earlier that it sounded interestig, but no, I've never read it.

Are you looking forward to the movie?

Oh yes. Definitely. Sounds like a very powerful and amazing movie.

I am waiting for the Trailor. I think they should come with a teaser at least.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Mr_Glass.1 on February 09, 2009, 01:35:11 PM
Any word on the trailer yet?
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: shadowbender on February 09, 2009, 06:50:40 PM
Nope, no word. They don't even have a specific release date for it yet, unfortunately.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on February 09, 2009, 08:51:17 PM
I think they are coming with a teaser poster in the beginning of March. If not a teaser poster then I am sure a teaser trailor. As far as I see the new cover of the book featuring Viggo as THE MAN, is the poster.

I read an article that they wanted the movie to be included in this years oscars and they realized things are not completed on time. The release date from November 2008 pushed for 2009 release.

The article also stated that it may release the movie during August 2009 just to have it close to the award season.

At least releasing it on Summer 2009 will be awesome.

Rohan
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Mr_Glass.1 on February 10, 2009, 02:07:05 PM
But is it a good summer film, that's the question.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on February 10, 2009, 08:57:51 PM
But is it a good summer film, that's the question.

The movie is big and the plot behind is powerful. I wanted them to release it on Summer because I want to watch the movie.
I have been waiting for it forever. So far no negative review about the screenings. There was an article about the movie on NYTIMES few months ago.
The article pretty much brought an spotlight on the directing,music and locations. Then NYTimes came with another article about the author of the book "Mccarthy".

The concept is powerful than I AM LEGEND. Even better than Omega Man that was released years ago. (I am Legend is the remake of OMEGA MAN)

Few lucky people already seen the movie in an special screening and believe me they were all surprised. Personally, I think they should release the movie, but again those who have seen it they are claiming that this movie is screaming for Oscars.

I advise you to read the book. Many tried to read it, but they couldn't finish it. So read it....if you can.

Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on February 10, 2009, 09:04:55 PM
Check out these pictures and commen on it. Who Wants To watch this movie badly.....?

http://www.shockya.com/news/wp-content/uploads/the_road_still_viggo_mortensen_movie.jpg


http://i383.photobucket.com/albums/oo273/moviesfilms2009/the-road-movie-set.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v284/Knaustin/movie%20stills/the-roa d-new-1.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v284/Knaustin/movie%20stills/the-roa d-new-3-viggo.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v284/Knaustin/movie%20stills/the-roa d-new-4-viggo.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v284/Knaustin/movie%20stills/the-roa d-new-5-viggo.jpg

From an unknown source:

We haven't been able to figure out what's going on with John Hillcoat's "The Road" yet and its not for lack of trying. We've pestered The Weinstein PR people a few times now and we can't get them to even hint at a release date or get anything out of them other than a stonewalled, "there's no update." But, some new images have found their way onto the web today so that's at least something (some larger versions on a click).

The last reports in the trades suggested "The Road" -- which stars Viggo Mortensen and Kodi Smit-McPhee as father in son traversing the perils of a Cormac McCarthy-inspired post-apocalyptic world -- would come out in the first quarter of 2009, and the month of February was even thrown around. Well, February is here and there's no way in hell, they're releasing it later this month or even March at this point.

TWC is going to at least give two months of marketing heads up -- at least! -- so given the tone of the film (some have said, "prepared to have your heart torn open") it's looking more and more like this film is going to be saved for the fall, Oscar-bait season where it belongs, which pleases us to no end (they wouldn't release this in the summer would they??). Hillcoat's "The Proposition," in 2005 was a fantastic film with a similar bleak and ravaged look, so we're greatly looking forward to it. Charlize Theron, Guy Pierce, Michael Kenneth Williams and Robert Duvall all make small appearances in the picture as well. The delayed-movie is one of the key films in our 60 Most Anticipated Films of 2009 list.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: shadowbender on February 11, 2009, 06:47:11 PM
I don't think it will come out this Summer. If it was, it would probably be announced. I'm gonna guess sometime this winter, November or December. It'll be unfortunate if it comes out that late, because I'm really looking forward to this.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on February 11, 2009, 09:54:58 PM
I don't think it will come out this Summer. If it was, it would probably be announced. I'm gonna guess sometime this winter, November or December. It'll be unfortunate if it comes out that late, because I'm really looking forward to this.

I know...I have been waiting for a long time.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: shadowbender on February 13, 2009, 09:51:58 PM
I don't think it will come out this Summer. If it was, it would probably be announced. I'm gonna guess sometime this winter, November or December. It'll be unfortunate if it comes out that late, because I'm really looking forward to this.

I know...I have been waiting for a long time.

Yeah...this happens with a lot of movies. You wait for them for years.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on February 15, 2009, 02:37:36 PM
I don't think it will come out this Summer. If it was, it would probably be announced. I'm gonna guess sometime this winter, November or December. It'll be unfortunate if it comes out that late, because I'm really looking forward to this.

I know...I have been waiting for a long time.

Yeah...this happens with a lot of movies. You wait for them for years.

I remember it happend with - The New World.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on February 15, 2009, 02:46:16 PM
GOOD NEWS  

The Road is finished. Its complete. According to the Cinefools :

Hey FOOLS! I was able to have a quick chat with producer Steve Schwarz yesterday, I asked him what the progress of The Road was and while he couldn't say much about the film he has confirmed the film has just been finished. Hopefully we can hear and see more of the film, I got the vibe a release date is not too far off being announced so we'll most definately keep you posted on that when it is announced.

I can't wait to see this film, when I read the book it completely floored me and I'm sure the film will do the same. To whet your appetite here is Viggo in all his Road-ly glory.


Link: http://www.cinefools.com/ViewArticle.aspx?ArticleID=608
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on February 15, 2009, 02:52:29 PM
An Interview with one of the Baby Eaters.- spoilers.

From Collegian Online
http://www.collegian.psu.edu/archive/2009/02/09/student_takes_road_tri p_appear.aspx

Student takes 'road' trip; appears in upcoming film
By Erin Rowley
Collegian Staff Writer

At Penn State he goes by Andy Goga, but in the film The Road, he's better known as Baby Eater #3.

Goga (freshman-division of undergraduate studies) will play a small role in The Road, scheduled to be released sometime in 2009 by The Weinstein Co. The movie is a post-apocalyptic film based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel of the same title by Cormac McCarthy, who also authored No Country for Old Men.

The story follows a man and his son traveling across the country, trying to survive in the now barren landscape.

"They try to avoid people like me who eat children," Goga said, adding he has read the book.

Goga auditioned for a small role in the film after his mother saw an ad in the paper that she thought described her son.

"My mom said, 'Hey look, there's this ad in the paper calling for very pale, skinny bearded men,' " he said.

Goga said he agreed he was perfect for the part because he is indeed "very pale and very skinny and bearded," but that wasn't enough on its own to get the part.

"I took some pictures of myself covered in mud and wearing a loin cloth, and they gave me an audition slot," he said.

Goga's mother, Karen Goga, said her son had just starred as the Cowardly Lion in his high school's musical, The Wizard of Oz. She thought his interest in acting -- and the beard he grew for the part -- would make him a frontrunner for the role in The Road, she said.

After proving he could portray a savage cannibal, the film's producers put makeup on Goga and had him try on "weird" clothes full of dirt and holes, he said.

Goga, who lives about 20 miles north of Pittsburgh, drove for about an hour and a half until reaching southwestern Pennsylvania, where the filming took place, he said.

"It kind of looked like the moon after a nuclear winter. I didn't even know such places existed on Earth," he said of the location.

Though Goga's role is small, he said he enjoyed watching and being involved with the filmmaking process. He added he enjoyed meeting the movie's stars, including Viggo Mortensen.

"I shook his hand," Goga said. "He didn't seem like the friendliest guy, but I'm sure he had a lot to do."

Because of the makeup necessary for the movie, Goga also sat next to a star actor without even realizing it.

"I was getting my makeup done next to this older gentleman," he said. "It turned out it was Robert Duvall."

The extreme hair, makeup and clothing, which were chemically treated to make them look dirty, will make it difficult for even Goga's close friends to recognize him, he said.

"They gave me this haggard sort of wig, so I have this long hair draped over my face. They probably wouldn't recognize me unless I told them to watch out for it," he said.

Though Goga's mother said The Road isn't the kind of movie she would normally see, and "she's more into romantic comedies," she will definitely check it out, and said

she thinks she can recognize her son anywhere -- no matter how much makeup he's wearing.

Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on February 22, 2009, 06:57:42 PM
Good review. Read It.

Caught a screening of 'The Road' a few days ago in NYC and thought I'd write in my thoughts. I'll keep this spoiler-free for the most part.

They prefaced to us that the movie was still a 'work in progress.' Apparently some coloring, sound mixing, and effects still had yet to be completed. They must have been very technical because I didn't see any sign of an unfinished movie.

I'm an avid Cormac McCarthy fan and 'The Road' is my favorite of his works. It's by far his most poetic book which made me weary of seeing it made into a film, because how can any filmmaker capture his gorgeous prose and put it up on a screen? The Coen Brothers did it to near perfection, but 'The Road' is far more abstract and minimalistic than No Country for Old Men.

Well it's been done. Because this movie is incredible.

If you've heard anything about this story the word 'post-apocalyptic' has surely come up. Well yes, it is about that, but that acts more as a vessel to tell a story about what's left to do once all hope is lost. There is no hope left in this story. This is not Children of Men where we are wondering if maybe the world can get another kick start. This is what's left of an ant pile after you spray it with a hose for an hour. A few ants still running around with nothing left and waiting to die. Everyone who is familier with the book will be pleased to know that the reason the world is over ramains ambiguous. There is no reason to explain it and the rest of the film follows suit, giving us just what's needed so all that's left is a stripped down account of the relationship between a father and his son in these circumstances.

John Hillcoat has taken this dark and brooding story and turned it into something so cinematic yet still maintaining an absolutely faithful adaptation. I had read in an interview with him a while back where he said he was planning on adding a bit more color to this movie because an audience 'doesn't want to look at grey for 2 hours.' Well if he did he made it very very subtle because the color scheme works entirely. It's still very grey and still very dark. The scope of this movie is unbelievable with vast and detailed landscapes representing a dead world. These shots are accompanied by voiceovers spoken by The Man from passages taken directly from the book. As far as the visual aspects go and how much we are allowed to see of this world is niether overdone or underdone. It's not JUST a forest and it's not The Day After Tomorrow. The artistic direction really substitutes for the writing in the book and helped to give me the same feeling I got when I read it. A perfect balance.

So we have these seven performances that make up this movie.

Robert Duvall, Guy Pearce, Garret Dillahunt and Michael K. Williams all have one scene each of very important characters, all of which give us a very good portrait of every aspect of this society. I could go off on each of them and how they gave each role so much and why it worked so well with the world of the movie but this review would be far too long. They're all just great.

The other three that were so important to making this movie successful simply nailed it. Viggo Mortensen, to me, was genius choice of casting from the start. That desparation that we've seen in him (the "we don't kill babies" scene from Eastern Promises to name an example) is flooded throughout this performance. How do you lead your only son through a scorched world in search of nothing? What is the point? Well Viggo finds one and it will tear your heart out. He also finds a few points to make us laugh, which is more than necessary given the nature of this movie. Kodi Smit-McPhee. Is he good? Does he get the job done? Everyone is wondering. The answer is you have nothing to worry about. The kid is one hell of an actor. He's a boy born into this world, knowing nothing of what was. He's heard stories of birds and the sky but they all have to live in his imagination. And they do. Because he has stories from books and his father to teach him what once was a reality. And to a boy that doesn't know more than a destroyed planet, this creates one hell of a ball of light in a dark dark world. This kid's compassion and optimism and love for the remainder of humanity is heightened by the fact that all those attributes are since extinct. It's jolting to others he comes in contact with. Finally we have Charliz Theron who gives her best performance to date. (Even better than her overrated performance in 'Monster' which in my opinion was nothing more than an overglorified impression of Michael Keaton.) She exists only in flashbacks and represents one of the many victims of a person who's soul died with the world. Hoplessness has overtaken her to a point where she only exists as a hollowed out shell of a person, waiting to fall just like the trees in the deceased world. Love has lost its meaning and her steady decline is heartbreaking.

The score worked really will by Nick Cave. Lots of strings. It was sort of a giant mix of Jonny Greenwood, Clint Mansell, and Michael Nyman. But it really gave the movie a great tone.

The movie sucks you into a completely different world and it's nearly impossible to peel yourself away from it for it's duration. as slow-paced as this movie can be, like in the book, there are riviting moments that will make you jump out of your seat with disgust, excitment, and suspense. These moments are spaced out perfectly and with each one you are pulled in further into the horror being presented. This was a giant screening with a huge movie theatre completely filled. Most people had no knowledge of what they were getting themelves into. The audience was very communal, silent at the right parts and audibly gasping at other parts. The feel I got from reactions on my way out was that they were all on a crazy ride together. People who didn't like depressing movies didn't like it, but people who liked GOOD movies, even if it is depressing, loved it. There was one jump cut in particular that I can remember that reminded me of the famous cut in 2001: A Space Oddesy. A dramatic cut from what was to what is. It's in the beginning and it'll hit you hard.

That's about it. I have a feeling that when this movie finally hits it'll be a big deal. I know I praised the hell out of it but I really did like it that much. I couldn't hardly find one thing about it I hope to see changed in the final product. Let's hope they don't change it up too much.

Done and done.

If you use this call me Viper X.

source: Aintitcool.com

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Listen to Cormac and also the soundtrack in the background.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/today/hi/today/newsid_7898000/7898685.stm
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on March 08, 2009, 05:52:24 PM
Anybody any news about this movie? - please post it here.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Namaste on March 08, 2009, 09:16:22 PM
lol, rohan, you're the only person posting in here  :o
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on March 09, 2009, 10:29:07 AM
lol, rohan, you're the only person posting in here  :o

Yep.  8)
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: shadowbender on March 09, 2009, 03:56:29 PM
On comingsoon.net, it says the release date of The Road is TBA 2009. I'm wondering if that means that they're trying to release at the end of this year, or if this is an assumption.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on March 09, 2009, 06:31:09 PM
On comingsoon.net, it says the release date of The Road is TBA 2009. I'm wondering if that means that they're trying to release at the end of this year, or if this is an assumption.

I think they will release it at the end of year, close to the award season.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on March 09, 2009, 08:12:28 PM
Where in the World is ?The Road??

?It essentially comes down to this: if The Road sucks or distributor Dimension Films tosses the movie into a time capsule for release in the next decade? I?m going to have to carefully reconsider my life. We?re talking ?Chicken Soup for the Soul? and a trip to India here, folks. Yet, my oracle talents feel on their game tonight, and I?m saying Cormac McCarthy and Viggo Mortensen can book their hotels and plane tickets for Oscars 2009.? ? David Frank (that?s me!), 2/27/08

Sometimes I should just leave hyperbole to Harry Knowles and the fortune telling to the cookies sold at The Sushi House across the street. The above quote came from an editorial in which I singled out The Road as my most anticipated film of 2008. We?re now heading into year two of ?The Road Watch,? and my obsession with this novel and film is well on its way to becoming an annual editorial just like ?Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus? ? ?Yes Virginia, there is a film based on The Road, and if the world ever sees it, no one will believe in Santa Claus.? There?s a new calendar hanging on my wall ? with cute pandas wrestling grizzly bears this year ? and one thing remains certain: The Road is the only film I?d crawl through a dozen Tyler Perry movies to see.

But that?s assuming it?s released in 2009. Last year, I kidded about Dimension Films (a.k.a. The Weinstein Company) dropping the film into a time capsule for Nicolas Cage to find and use to predict the apocalypse (that joke will remain just as unfunny when Knowing comes out), but who knew that?d be the one thing I?d get right. However, this was always a possibility after Dimension became the film?s distributor. The Weinstein brothers are infamous for weighing down their vault shelves with films for countless years and then spitting them out on two screens for a week. It?s a twisted hobby for them. And I fear the negative for The Road may end up propping up Bob Weinstein?s coffee table (probably the same one with the Killshot negative as a coaster).

For those paying attention to more important things such as the economy or the fate of the kiddie actors from Slumdog Millionaire, here?s how things went down. The Road?s original release date was mid-November 2008. When October rolled by and no official poster or trailer had arrived (although a bland official site found its way onto the Internet), everyone knew something was up. As it turned out, the suspicions were correct. Instead of discussing The Road around the water-cooler in November, I was stuck arguing about how Robert Pattinson styles his hair (kids, the secret is stripper juice). Apparently The Road wasn?t quite ready in time, and The Weinstein Company planned to focus all attention on purchasing Oscar nominations for The Reader (which in the end, turned out quite well for Kate Winslet and quite horrible for anyone who can?t stomach films unintentionally catering to Holocaust deniers). There was the rumor the Weinsteins might sneak The Road into a late December date with a limited opening to hedge their bets in case The Reader?s Oscar-bribing failed, and if December didn?t work out, just maybe we?d get it in the first quarter of 2009. Of course neither happened. And BAM! All official news on The Road?s release date completely fell off the map (yes, I?ve been waiting to type that sentence for awhile now).

We know the film has been screened for test audiences in the last few month because several websites have ran those odious, barely literate reader reviews posted by such trusted sources as Kabong or Viper X or some guy just named Dave (seriously, when are certain web masters going to realize how useless that bull#@!* is?). And according to a recent BBC report ? which features a few notes of Nick Cave?s and Warren Ellis? score ? the film is finished and the novel?s author, Cormac McCarthy, has seen it and approves. The BBC also guesses that the film may not arrive until fall 2009 to improve its Oscar chances (and knowing the Weinstein brothers? lust for golden bald dudes, that?s very likely). But it?s just that, a guess. From all appearances, no one outside of the filmmakers has a goddamn clue when the movie will hit the big screen.

Look, I?m happy the film was delayed if it wasn?t ready. I?m all for tweaking a film in order to get it right. Nothing worse than rushing a film to make a release date. Yet, the film is finished and now it?s time for Dimension Films to get its marketing on. The seed of a decent marketing campaign capitalizing on the novel?s prestige had begun last summer with high-profile set visits by the ?New York Times? and ?Los Angeles Times? (as far I know, none of us lowly web reporters were invited out to the set). Yet, that was some time ago, and the marketing is going to have to hit reset. Here?s a suggestion on how to begin the sales pitch: Give us an honest release date. Hell, I?ll take a month. No, I?ll take a season and a year, as long as the Weinsteins promise to stick to it. After dropping that info, maybe someone can take a day to cut a trailer together.

While The Road cost nickles to make (okay, $20 to $30 million worth of nickels), box-office profit is not guaranteed. The film will be a tough sell to the average moviegoer. After all, the book doesn?t leave any hope for mankind?s survival and details a world in which people have babies just to cook them on a spit. Yeah, it?s a feel-bad movie. From all accounts of those who?ve read the screenplay, the adaptation closely follows the book and will probably be a violent, quiet, thoughtful piece of filmmaking that doesn?t kowtow to the stupid (at least that?s a best-case scenario).

Yet, the film does have three wildly divergent demographics it can appeal to and bring to the box-office. You?ve got the arty-farty-smarty literary types wowed by the novel and who already enjoy cerebral independent cinema ? this is who the fancy-pants ?New York Times? and ?Los Angeles Times? articles were geared towards. Then you have the Oprah Book Club soccer moms who read McCarthy?s novel because Commander Oprah ordered them to do so. If some advertising plays towards the parent-child angle, which it must since that?s the story?s core, then Dimension can probably pull those ladies in. And finally you have the geeks, nerds and fanboys. Sure, this crowd normally doesn?t get excited unless a movie has transforming robots or men in leotards, but The Road does have cannibals roaming around the countryside trying to eat children ? and geeks tend to eat that #@!* up.

Personally, I believe the geeks, nerds and fanboys could be the largest potential demographic for The Road if Dimension Films figures out how to market the film to them (begin by defying all expectations and have a presence at San Diego Comic Con ? okay, I admit that?s just a wild dream of mine, but the horror aspect of the story does play for this sort of event). It also doesn?t hurt that most of the movie news websites, whose readership consists mainly of geeks, nerds and fanboys, are in The Road?s corner ? otherwise, why else would I be writing this editorial. When the rare bit of news on The Road does dribble out, you can count on nearly every major movie-news website covering it, and then whining about the absence of a release date. If Lionsgate can manipulate these websites into whipping up the fanboys for its Saw franchise year after year, I don?t see why the powerful Weinsteins couldn?t manage the same feat* with a film that also features plenty of gruesome death along with post-apocalyptic destruction and names such as Viggo Mortensen and Charlize Theron making up the cast. So what if it?s a tad more prestigious than torture-porn, no one has to know until the credits roll, and by then they have been washed over by what is hopefully a great movie and won?t even care.

Yet, maybe the film sucks and Dimension is playing shadow games with the release date solely for that reason. It?s always possible. And while The Road is the only film I?ve gotten fanboyish over in the last several years (yes, I do feel dirty for attaching myself to that term), I wouldn?t back down from calling it a piece of #@!* if it so happens to turn out that way ? although I?d be crushed, buuuut not I?m-moving-to-India-for-soul-searching type of crushed. Yet, I?m still willing to bet large sums of cash (um, let?s say Monopoly cash because I?m cheap) that Dimension has, at the very least, a good film on their hands, if not a great one. But who will ever know if it isn?t shown to the public?

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Not only us, everybody who read the book is waiting for this movie.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Mr_Glass.1 on March 10, 2009, 01:26:13 PM
This is kind of like what happened to Valkyrie, it just kept getting pushed back and back, and then it finally came out-and was very good.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on March 10, 2009, 01:53:45 PM
This is kind of like what happened to Valkyrie, it just kept getting pushed back and back, and then it finally came out-and was very good.

You are right. Totally forgot about that.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: shadowbender on March 12, 2009, 04:36:35 PM
This reminds me of "Inkheart". They finished filming years ago, and they don't release it for such a long time. "The Road" needs to get a better studio.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on March 12, 2009, 04:45:00 PM
This reminds me of "Inkheart". They finished filming years ago, and they don't release it for such a long time. "The Road" needs to get a better studio.

Exactly. I hope they promote the movie good on time. I know the delayed the release for the oscars next year, but their promotion must be really good.

Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: shadowbender on March 12, 2009, 05:03:14 PM
This reminds me of "Inkheart". They finished filming years ago, and they don't release it for such a long time. "The Road" needs to get a better studio.

Exactly. I hope they promote the movie good on time. I know the delayed the release for the oscars next year, but their promotion must be really good.



I agree. They really need to market this film well. I'm worried, though, because we're leaving this in the hands of The Weinstein Company. It's not a bad studio, but it's definitely not great with their marketing. Hopefully, they'll see how good this film will be and actually consider marketing well.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on March 12, 2009, 06:01:58 PM
This reminds me of "Inkheart". They finished filming years ago, and they don't release it for such a long time. "The Road" needs to get a better studio.

Exactly. I hope they promote the movie good on time. I know the delayed the release for the oscars next year, but their promotion must be really good.



I agree. They really need to market this film well. I'm worried, though, because we're leaving this in the hands of The Weinstein Company. It's not a bad studio, but it's definitely not great with their marketing. Hopefully, they'll see how good this film will be and actually consider marketing well.

This is what everyone says about Wienstein Company, they better do a good marketing for the film. CormaC MCcarthy the author of the novel, already seen the movie and he approves it. I hope the marketing is good.

Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: shadowbender on March 13, 2009, 05:25:58 PM
Well that's good news the author approved it, but yeah, I still hope they market it really well.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on March 13, 2009, 09:59:52 PM
Yes it is a good thing to know that the author approves of the film. I read an artlcle online, there was discussion about the movie "The Road". No negative review from anyone so far and I know there will not be any negative review. Critics or regular audience are so far satisfied by the movie and direction of this movie. There were special screenings were held for specific audience. And some was lucky enough to watch the movie.

I will consider myself lucky, cause the movie will be completed to the fullest when it will release later this year.

There are people saying THE ROAD will be one of those movies that will make you pray to God to protect from that day which is told in the novel. I prayed right after I finished reading the novel. It was hard for me to leave the characters and I was really sad what happens in the end and also happy what happens in the end. I will not spoil it - it is up to you anyone here to read the novel or wait for the film's release.

People are also claiming that THE ROAD will be the next Exorcist. There will be protests, vomting uproars from the religious groups and concerned people, parents. When people comes out the theatre, they better take this globe serious. They better stop the hatred and wars. I know lots of people made fun of 'The Happening' they never understood the meaning behind the movie. If by any chance incident like in THE HAPPENING or THE ROAD comes - there will be nothing funny at all.

Still no single trailer from THE ROAD - I think I have to take a day off from my work and script and start knocking at Weistein's Door - Is Road finished? - will be my question.



Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: shadowbender on March 14, 2009, 10:49:43 AM
"The Road" could indeed be very controversial.

And no negative review? That's awesome. It's proof it'll be awesome.

That's cool that people found a meaning behind it, and it sounds emotional.

That's a great idea by the way. We should call up The Weinstein Company and ask them about where thy are on the post-production of "The Road". We have to ask about the release date, and when a trailer will come up.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on March 14, 2009, 08:01:03 PM
"The Road" could indeed be very controversial.

And no negative review? That's awesome. It's proof it'll be awesome.

That's cool that people found a meaning behind it, and it sounds emotional.

That's a great idea by the way. We should call up The Weinstein Company and ask them about where thy are on the post-production of "The Road". We have to ask about the release date, and when a trailer will come up.


Yes, no negative review so far. They so Viggo Mortenson deserves an academy award for his performance.
And the director deserves an academy award for his work on THE ROAD. The newcomer, little boy playing the role of THE BOY has done an incredible job, says critics, people and Viggo Mortenson himself.

Do you want to email the studio or should I? Let me know....
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: shadowbender on March 14, 2009, 09:32:05 PM
Well, I looked for the address and everything online, and I couldn't find anything. I could do more research, or we need to get IMDb Pro subscription. But I'll be willing to call them.

EDIT: Hmm, I found a mail address, but this for questions and comments about privacy policy. Dang it, I think we need to get a subscription for IMDb Pro.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on March 14, 2009, 10:16:33 PM
Well, I looked for the address and everything online, and I couldn't find anything. I could do more research, or we need to get IMDb Pro subscription. But I'll be willing to call them.

EDIT: Hmm, I found a mail address, but this for questions and comments about privacy policy. Dang it, I think we need to get a subscription for IMDb Pro.

Do we have to pay for IMDB Pro?

This is what I found:

Ste 600
5700 Wilshire Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90036
(323) 207-3080
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: shadowbender on March 15, 2009, 11:54:00 AM
Well, I looked for the address and everything online, and I couldn't find anything. I could do more research, or we need to get IMDb Pro subscription. But I'll be willing to call them.

EDIT: Hmm, I found a mail address, but this for questions and comments about privacy policy. Dang it, I think we need to get a subscription for IMDb Pro.

Do we have to pay for IMDB Pro?

This is what I found:

Ste 600
5700 Wilshire Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90036
(323) 207-3080


Hmm, I wonder if that address would work. But yeah, I think you do have to pay for IMDb Pro.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on March 15, 2009, 01:57:24 PM
Well, I looked for the address and everything online, and I couldn't find anything. I could do more research, or we need to get IMDb Pro subscription. But I'll be willing to call them.

EDIT: Hmm, I found a mail address, but this for questions and comments about privacy policy. Dang it, I think we need to get a subscription for IMDb Pro.

Do we have to pay for IMDB Pro?

This is what I found:

Ste 600
5700 Wilshire Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90036
(323) 207-3080


Hmm, I wonder if that address would work. But yeah, I think you do have to pay for IMDb Pro.

May be we should try to call them.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on March 18, 2009, 09:17:37 PM
This is the real and official look of the poster from the movie THE ROAD. The picture was way blurry and too much white color was used as someone probably had it scanned from a megazine. I found it fun and the good thing is that we have the official release season for the movie mentioned on the poster and it FALL 2009.

The text was on the lower left side of the scanned poster, I put the text at top of the poster with its real picture. Looks good to me and I don't know what you guys are going to think about it. I can't help myself, I love the book and I will love the movie, been waiting for a long time.

Enjoy the poster.

(http://www.geocities.com/rm_mohmand/theroad.jpg)
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on March 19, 2009, 02:28:23 PM
SHOOTING THE ROAD

Enjoy it...

http://www.flickr.com/photos/chrisbuddyphotos/3329474364/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/chrisbuddyphotos/3328640965/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/chrisbuddyphotos/3328640855/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/chrisbuddyphotos/3328640773/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/chrisbuddyphotos/3328640689/

-----------------------------------

As far as the movie poster is concerned, it says the movie release is during FALL of 2009. Which means we will get a trailer soon. May be, around May or June.

Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on March 19, 2009, 02:38:28 PM
The Road - Cormac McCarthy SPOILERS

Cormac McCarthy?s tale of a post-apocalyptic America The Road opens on a road where a father and his son trudge along pushing a shopping trolley filled with their earthly belongings in a world all but destroyed, where the dying land is burnt black, forests defoliated and ashened, the sky perpetually gray. It is always cold, dark, damp and gloomy.  There is nothing beautiful about the rain falling in this story because it only adds to the prevailing sense of sorrow that weighs heavier and heavier as the story unravels.

But despite the foreboding about what lays ahead on the road, and what lurks behind, there is still light and hope in the strong affection and bond between father and son, or Man and Boy as they are simply called in the book. One being the other?s sole reason to fight and continue living, or as McCarthy wrote it - each the other?s world entire. The boy has no mother. She saw no hope in living after the cataclysmic event and chose to commit suicide. It is hard not to be touched by the love the father has for the son; how he wills himself to survive for the son, and how the son gives him hope that maybe the next day will be different.

And yet, tomorrow is always the same as yesterday. And today is only about making it through to tomorrow. The road they are traveling on is never ending, but they soldier on towards the coast to reach warmer climate. Along the way, they hide in bushes on the roadside, in abandoned homes in empty towns, avoid coveys of lost souls like them who have been reduced to the lowest form of humanity to survive; some resorting to cannibalism. Always, the Man tries to shield his son?s eyes from these sights, to protect his innocence in a world broken beyond repair. Moments like these, one aches for the boy and feels the hopelessness that surrounds them. It makes the heart turn heavy and subdued by the same feeling of not knowing what to do.

Ultimately, the book is not about the road, or about what cataclysmic event that led these two souls there. It is about a father and his son - their relationship. It always comes back to them, the way they communicate, the way the father takes care of the son, feeding him, fending for him, protecting him, giving him hope, sharing the dark dreams they both have in the even darker nights. It is the way he speaks to the boy, in simple yet so loving terms, and their conversations that is most affecting. Tender and gentle are the Man?s words to his son in the midst of their fight for survival, scavenging for sustenance - tin food found in cellars and empty houses, dried shrivelled apples found in the grounds of an orchard - and all the time, keeping a vigilant eye over themselves, looking out for marauders who are armed with weapons, hunting for other humans as food.

There is a scene where the Man and Boy discover a vaulted cellar and pry it open only to discover a group of people who had been captured and locked up as food stock. Slowly consumed by their captors, one limb at a time so that they can be kept alive for as long as possible in a world without electricity and refrigeration. It is a terrifying landscape and the Man carries with him a pistol with two bullets (the pistol is for protection but the bullets are for suicide when all hope is gone).

Through it all, it is the Boy who keeps the faith, reminding the Man that they are the ?good guys? and that they are the ones carrying the fire. When he falters, weighed down by the bleakness around him, it is always the Boy who props him up again, making sure he holds on to the humanity in him. The book ends with the death of the Man but the Boy survives, and is rescued by a family who had been traveling on the road behind them. The Man?s death is heart sinking but there is comfort and solace in the knowing that the Boy is with a loving family who has taken him in as one of their own.

This is by far one of the most touching stories out there. The focus is always on these two lonely travelers as they move across the violent landscape. The tension is gripping at times and it is a book that is hard to put down. McCarthy?s style of writing is raw and unique; ?Faulkneresque?, perhaps, seeing as McCarthy?s prose is often likened to William Faulker?s.

McCarthy is also the author of other notable titles such as Blood Meridian, Suttree, The Border Trilogy and No Country for Old Men. The Road won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 2007 and the James Tait Black Memorial Prize in 2006. It was also adapted into a movie starring Viggo Mortensen and Kodi Smit-McPhee as the Man and Boy, respectively. Oprah?s Book Club picked this book as one of its selections for 2007.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on March 19, 2009, 02:56:01 PM
One of my friends is based in Melbourne, Australia. He recently visited the Australian Centre For The Moving Image at Federation squarethey currently have a film design exhibition.

They had this special slideshow of locations from THE ROAD. He said that photos were great and breathtaking and stunningingly shot. I requested him to take few pictures and share it with me to wet my appetite. I hope I get some pictures from him, I think they don't allow cameras there.

I will post some pics, if I find any.

Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: shadowbender on March 19, 2009, 08:20:37 PM
Nice, Rohan!

I like the poster, and that's great about the release date. Fall 2009, should definitely see a trailer soon.

Just out of curiosity, did you find the photo online from someone who found it in a magazine.

Those are nice photos, too.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on March 19, 2009, 10:21:14 PM
Nice, Rohan!

I like the poster, and that's great about the release date. Fall 2009, should definitely see a trailer soon.

Just out of curiosity, did you find the photo online from someone who found it in a magazine.

Those are nice photos, too.

Yes, I found the poster online and it was scanned from a newspaper, at least it looked like it was scanned. It is the same picture, THE MAN's head was gone in the scanned picture and plus it was really white. I did the changes, brought the same picture and pasted the text upper side.

Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Namaste on March 19, 2009, 11:19:39 PM
Rohan, please indicate at the beginning of your posts if they are going to include spoilers.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on March 20, 2009, 09:58:25 AM
Rohan, please indicate at the beginning of your posts if they are going to include spoilers.

You're right. I apologize for that, I totaly forgot. In the meantime, Namaste I thought you already read the book before. I don't know, may be I am mistaking.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Namaste on March 20, 2009, 03:15:25 PM
I havent read it..but I would have made that comment anyway.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on March 20, 2009, 08:28:17 PM
I havent read it..but I would have made that comment anyway.

Did you read that whole article?
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Namaste on March 20, 2009, 11:16:10 PM
nope, just up till the first spoiler and didnt go any farther, in case there were more.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on March 21, 2009, 01:46:32 PM
nope, just up till the first spoiler and didnt go any farther, in case there were more.

Ok then. Well, I recommend to read the book before the movie comes out when you get the chance. Its going to be a total whole different experience for you. In the meantime, you will be craving to see the characters live on the screen. I have been waiting for this for a long long time....

Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on March 21, 2009, 02:14:37 PM
The Route and Roots of The Road

PRAISES in FLASH, please read them - http://www.randomhouse.com/kvpa/cormacmccarthy/

This is one of those books that begins out of nowhere and this is what I love about Cormac McCarthy's style of writing. Before I was introduced to his novels, I was always fond of starting my screenplay, out of nowhere kind of style. Out of nowhere kind of style, basically means that the story starts from a point where the reader should not thinking about it, but figure out the scene before it in his/her imagination. Like put your mind to the work kind of thing. Those who read his novels, they know what I am talking about.

I have read some of his books and still going to read the books I have not put my hands on yet. I am going to be building a section of books by Cormac McCarthy novels in my house. This is about THE ROAD - his most personal book. He wrote it when he was traveling with his son in Texas I believe and passing these hills and lands and he said that he thought of them burning. Then he looked at his son and he decided to write the novel when he was in Ireland.

The Road is special in many ways, not only struggle of a father to protect his only son, but also what we humans think of the world. There is whole different kind of world. No Hope and there is no guarantee that the next step could be death. I pictured myself in the same situation and prayed when I went to my bed after finishing the book. I don't want that kind of environment. I don't want that kind of day. I want spring, water, roads, streets and people. It taught me that we all humans need each other. Even though, we don't know each other or hate each other by looks, color of skin or beliefs, in the end it all comes to one common and simple thing that its hard for us humans to figure it out. WE ALL NEED EACH OTHER. Only the sight of each other anywhere means a lot. Imagine a city with no people, no souls.

Those who have not read the book yet, I strongly recommend this book.

The Road is a book that I will have my children read in the future. The Road is a book that I will treasure for the rest of my life. Even though there is harsh moments and violence in it, but all these negativity is part of our lives. We seen or foresee these moments because we know negativity is always versus positivity. What matters is that we can always defeat and endure the negativity. Positivity is really fragile, we must protect it.

The Road begins suddenly and ends suddenly, I am not going to reveal anything about it. It left me behind to think about the characters till date. The route they took, I imagined what route, what city, what was the name of the street they were walking on. What is the name of the town. I found this great site about THE ROUTE and ROOTS of THE ROAD.

Read it, there are some spoilers though, it is fun.

http://web.utk.edu/~wmorgan/TR/route.htm

Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on March 22, 2009, 03:07:41 PM
VIEWERS DISCRETION IS ADVISED

Below are a set of pictures from actor 'Jeremy Ambler'. He plays the "Man In Cellar", thanks to him for sharing his pictures from behind the scenes of THE ROAD. Its courtesy of his website http://www.jeremyambler.com

Behind The Scenes - The Road

(http://www.geocities.com/rohmoh22/DCP_8954.jpg)

(http://www.geocities.com/rohmoh22/DCP_8957.jpg)

(http://www.geocities.com/rohmoh22/DCP_8958.jpg)

(http://www.geocities.com/rohmoh22/DCP_8961.jpg)

(http://www.geocities.com/rohmoh22/DCP_8975.jpg)

(http://www.geocities.com/rohmoh22/DCP_8990.jpg)

(http://www.geocities.com/rohmoh22/DCP_8992.jpg)

(http://www.geocities.com/rohmoh22/DCP_8999.jpg)

(http://www.geocities.com/rohmoh22/DCP_9000.jpg)
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on March 22, 2009, 03:33:16 PM
Is this going to be the official title theme for THE ROAD? Sounds like it is matchng the theme of story and locations, even though if it is not the official theme. I thought to share it with everyone here. Make sure have the volume high to feel the impact.

And one more thing, the official website http://www.theroad-movie.com is not working when I tried to have access to it. I was wondering if it is working for others. Let us know. And if it is not working for real, then I assume they are updating the official website.

Make sure check the theme song for it. - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6AalvLP1-HE

Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on March 22, 2009, 06:30:19 PM
More images from THE ROAD. They're all in good quality. Enjoy.

http://www.beyondhollywood.com/the-road-2008-movie-images-gallery/
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on March 22, 2009, 07:53:51 PM
I was sitting idle today in my room. Pretty much nothing to do, I look outside through the blindes it was raining, sky was dark, no soul to be seen. I came with an idea which inspired me and brought this fan made poster of THE ROAD.

(http://www.geocities.com/rohmoh22/fanposter.jpg)

Created by Rohan
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: shadowbender on March 23, 2009, 05:57:31 PM
That's awesome, Rohan.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on March 23, 2009, 08:34:28 PM
That's awesome, Rohan.

Thanks. Did you check the previous page 5 of this thread. There are behind the scenes shoot pictures. Make up and stuff.

Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: shadowbender on March 24, 2009, 05:31:53 PM
That's awesome, Rohan.

Thanks. Did you check the previous page 5 of this thread. There are behind the scenes shoot pictures. Make up and stuff.



Yeah, I did. They were cool, and very realistic. Can't wait to see the final product.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: ~Cheeto~ on March 24, 2009, 06:01:49 PM
VIEWERS DISCRETION IS ADVISED

Below are a set of pictures from actor 'Jeremy Ambler'. He plays the "Man In Cellar", thanks to him for sharing his pictures from behind the scenes of THE ROAD. Its courtesy of his website http://www.jeremyambler.com

Behind The Scenes - The Road

(http://www.geocities.com/rohmoh22/DCP_8954.jpg)


heh...nice teeth!!! ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on March 24, 2009, 08:17:09 PM
Actor Mortensen praises young Aussie co-star

US actor Viggo Mortensen has compared rising Australian star Kodi Smit-McPhee to legends Marlon Brando and Montgomery Clift after working together on upcoming film The Road.

Mortensen, 50, and Smit-McPhee, 12, play father and son in the film adaptation of Cormac McCarthy's 2006 post-apocalyptic novel.

Mortensen, who is in Australia to promote his new movie Good, was full of praise for his "self-confident, daring and kind" co-star.

"He's an incredibly talented actor, beyond his years," Mortensen told AAP.

"To me he was doing things - mostly just out of instinct and sheer raw talent - that actors like Montgomery Clift or Marlon Brando pioneered, [such as] having access to emotions and naturalistic way of listening and really being present and really engaging with the other performer.

"I remember the scenes we were doing with Robert Duvall, who plays the old man we encounter on the road, and after just a few minutes he looked at me and said 'Where did they get the kid? The kid's amazing'."

The Road tells of a journey taken by a father and his young son across a desolate landscape blasted years before by an unnamed disaster that destroyed civilisation and most life on earth.

Inundated with offers after his AFI Award-winning turn in Romulus My Father, Smit-McPhee dropped out of Wolverine to be part of it.

Mortensen said it was lucky for the filmmakers that he did.

"I know he was very good in Romulus, My Father but I think he takes it a step further in terms of acting in this movie," Mortensen said.

"And he had to really because ... one of the keys to making the movie interesting, to making that relationship work, is you have to have the best kid actor possible.

"The kid has to be really something unusual, and they were very lucky that he did it."

The Road is directed by Australian John Hillcoat (The Proposition) and also features Guy Pearce.

It was originally due to be released in late 2008, but has been pushed back until the last quarter of this year.

"I have hopes not just for the movie, but especially for him," Mortensen said.

"I think it will be a big deal for Kodi."

Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: shadowbender on March 27, 2009, 12:30:25 PM
Interesting interview. That actor sounds great.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on April 03, 2009, 09:29:03 PM
The Road is one of "Entertainment Weekly"'s 20 Fall Movies They Can't Wait to See

Cormac McCarthy's 2006 post-apocalyptic novel about a dying man who tries to lead his young son to safety was a critical darling that grabbed the attention of readers and, yes, even Oprah (not to mention us — The Road nabbed the No. 1 spot on EW's New Classics book list). So why should the film adaptation be any different? Though certainly bleak, the film has Oscar written all over it. And when has Mortensen ever let us down?
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on April 03, 2009, 09:36:26 PM
Cormac McCarthy's "The Road" comes to the big screen Some Spoilers

Ext. ROAD -- DAY

In the burnt, barren landscape, through swirls of soft ash and smoggy air the MAN appears dressed as if homeless, a filthy old parka with the hood up, a knapsack on his back, pushing a rusted shopping cart with a bicycle mirror clamped to the handle and a blue tarp now covering its load. The little BOY, similarly dressed with a knapsack on his back, shuffles through the ash at his side.

Screenwriter Joe Penhall's adaptation of Cormac McCarthy's bestselling novel opens with the two survivors of some unspoken earthly catastrophe enduring an earthquake, witnessing a forest fire, stepping around a severed human leg and discovering a family of three who have hanged themselves -- all before Page 8. In Penhall's script, father and son also encounter a man stumbling along in near blindness, his hair singed, his flesh charred; run from a pack of gun-toting cannibals; and find a crudely painted billboard proclaiming, "Behold the Valley of Slaughter."

The world -- and everything in it -- is dying, and the Man and the Boy are determined to keep moving, knowing that if they stop, some horrible fate will claim them. The shopping cart's mirror isn't for decoration: It's to see if anyone is gaining on them. In such dire circumstances, the least comfort -- fresh food, clean water, a blanket -- is magnified into the greatest luxury, and that has made the scene that "The Road" director John Hillcoat was filming on a late spring day even more difficult to execute.

With a little more than a week of principal photography left on production of the film, the Man (Viggo Mortensen) and the Boy ("Romulus, My Father's" 11-year-old Kodi Smit-McPhee) had reached Horsetail Falls, a cataract thundering into a verdant gulch an hour east of Portland. Especially by Oregon standards, it was a stunning early May morning: The weather was T-shirt warm, with songbirds flitting about in the waterfall's mist. As Penhall and Hillcoat imagined the scene, which falls in the screenplay's first quarter, the two actors would wade into the waterfall's icy pool and, for a moment, pretend as if there was nothing wrong and the world hadn't become a soot-covered graveyard.: The Boy even remarked to the Man, "Look. Colors."

But as Hillcoat saw it, the Oregon setting was proving to be too picturesque. "It's a beautiful day," the Australian-born filmmaker said somewhat dejectedly. "I hope it clouds up."

It was a fair summation of the film's tonal balancing act. In adapting McCarthy's National Book Award and Pulitzer Prize winner, Hillcoat and Penhall (as well as the actors and production team) toiled to weigh hopelessness against faith, the worst of humanity opposite the possibility of civilization. But for some, including one top distributor of specialized film who passed on the Nov. 14 release, the cinematic version of "The Road" was ultimately still too bleak to appeal to moviegoers.

So even as the filmmakers were ratcheting up the story's danger and despair, they also were pushing to make the movie as uplifting as possible, emphasizing its intrinsic father-son love story and promoting the notion that the Boy embodies some sort of messiah. Along the way, movie version also became much less a story about a post-nuclear catastrophe and more a tale of climate change and a dying planet.

"The fact that my character keeps going," a reed-thin Mortensen said during a lunch break from filming under the waterfall, "is inherently hopeful and optimistic."

A course correction

PUBLISHED before "No Country for Old Men" was fashioned by Joel and Ethan Coen into their Oscar-winning masterwork, "The Road" represented a course correction for McCarthy. While its pages overflowed with his typically baroque diction and slightly pretentious lack of punctuation, the novel wasn't anchored by the epic narrative sweep of "No Country," "Blood Meridian" or "All the Pretty Horses" (and the rest of McCarthy's border trilogy).

nstead, its story focused on a dying man and a young boy struggling to remain alive as they traveled through a barren land with little food or water and even less consolation.

In addition, "The Road" was more contained (287 not very crowded pages) and personal than McCarthy's previous novels -- one he described, albeit elliptically, in a rare interview on "The Oprah Winfrey Show," whose host had picked the novel for her influential book group.

"I like to think it's just about the boy and the man on the road, but obviously you can draw conclusions about all sorts of things from reading the book, depending on your taste," McCarthy said on the talk show. Tellingly, the 75-year-old author dedicated the book to his elementary-school-age son, John.

Even on McCarthy's gothic scale for brutality, the 2006 novel was disturbingly depressing, not only in its specifically imagined terrors (notably including the roasting of a fetus on a spit) but also for its day-of-reckoning story line. For some people, especially parents, contemplating Armageddon alone with a child, even in a piece of fiction, was too unsettling to consider. There are people who openly weep reading "The Road," and many others who can't even pick it up.

Producer Nick Wechsler ("The Player," "Drugstore Cowboy") appreciated how troubling the book was but understood that underneath all of its desolation lay a story of hope and courage. "It's kind of ingrained in all fathers to protect their children," Wechsler said. "I wasn't afraid of the bleakness of the book, the darkness of the book."

Using money from public relations executives and nascent producers Steve and Paula Mae Schwartz, Wechsler won "The Road's" movie rights in a bidding war before the book was published. He then approached Hillcoat, unaware that the British filmmaker had directed 2005's little-seen but highly regarded western "The Proposition" as a homage to McCarthy's "Blood Meridian." (Like "Blood Meridian," Hillcoat's "The Proposition" is a bloody meditation on frontier justice where the rule of law is both a principle and a casualty.)

The rights deal for "The Road" closed before the book started sweeping up so many accolades -- "I think the success of the book took a lot of people by surprise," Hillcoat says -- and came as part of a fresh push to turn McCarthy's earlier books into films.

"No Country's" Academy Award-winning producer Scott Rudin and "Little Children" filmmaker Todd Field have been developing a "Blood Meridian" movie, and Australian filmmaker Andrew Dominik wants to film "Cities on the Plain," the last book in McCarthy's border trilogy. Said Field in explaining McCarthy's appeal: "His work examines our core, the two faces of violence that co-exist in every savage act -- brutal strength of purpose holding hands with a desperate and cowering weakness."

Though "The Road" unfolds on an ample landscape, it is ultimately a personal story, a fable of how individuals react when facing extraordinary circumstances. "At its core is a primal struggle against the utmost extremes of the natural world -- and a thrilling evocation of human endurance," Hillcoat wrote in a memo he prepared for his creative team. "It is an unflinching examination of human beings at their worst -- and at their best. . . . By the end of the film, it is the child's innate goodness and grace under fire that changes the man, showing us that amidst barbarity, our humanity can be inextinguishable."

Still, given "The Road's" end-of-the-world plot, Wechsler thought it best to make the movie beyond the reach of studio executives (who doubtlessly would have said, "Can't it be a really bad tsunami rather than the apocalypse?") and took it to 2929 Entertainment, where Wechsler has a deal.

In a twist of kismet, Mark Cuban and Todd Wagner's 2929 ("Good Night, and Good Luck") had liked Hillcoat's "Proposition" so muchthey had approached the director about making a mob-police drama. With Hillcoat at the helm of "The Road," 2929 agreed to finance its $25-million budget. Richard Gere expressed interest in the lead role, but Hillcoat always had Mortensen in mind. The laconic actor seems a natural for the part; he's naturally thin (and even more gaunt in the film itself), and, as "A History of Violence" and "Eastern Promises" proved, carries the fearless determination necessary to escape most predicaments.

Fox Searchlight passed on distributing the film, fearful that its apocalyptic plot and unspeakable atrocities were too demanding to sell to a wide audience. "People do rationalize" about why "The Road" is too difficult, says 2929 production chief Mark Butan, who nevertheless dismissed such worries as unfounded. The Weinstein Co. had no such qualms and will release "The Road" this fall.

Departure from the book

WITH THE incessant threats -- cannibals, thieves, starvation, dehydration, hypothermia -- the Man and the Boy face, it would seem unnecessary to make their survival even more difficult, but that's precisely what Penhall ("Enduring Love") and Hillcoat chose to do.

The film's most obvious departure from the book -- outside of the elimination of the novel's vaguely nuclear "long shear of light" that stopped clocks at 1:17 -- is its redoubling of the book's fleeting flashbacks of the Man and his final days with his desperate and suicidal wife (Charlize Theron). Throughout the movie, the filmmakers also have amplified McCarthy's already vast peril.

As readers of the book will recall, McCarthy takes detours along his corridor of brutality and despair. While the father and son make their way to the coast for unknown reasons, they enjoy not only a splash in a pristine waterfall but also discover a trove of canned food, a cistern of clear water, and even a place to take a bath. Some of those fleeting reprieves appear in the movie, but they're not always as calming on the screen as they were on the page.

When the Man and the Boy find the bomb shelter filled with canned goods in the movie, for example, there's now someone (or something) trying to break in. Rather than only contemplating having to kill his son to spare him from cannibals, the Man in the movie now actually cocks his pistol at his boy's head. And after stumbling across a cellar filled with barely alive people headed for some cannibals' butchering, the Man and the Boy must now dodge the prey like a scene out of a zombie film.

"That's not only to heighten the threat but also to get variety," Hillcoat said while Mortensen and a shaking Smit-McPhee warmed up from their freezing swim, the sun having ducked out of sight. "There's a lot of repetition in the book."

Hillcoat also has made the planet more of an active character, adding a scene where two massive trees nearly crush father and son. "It just builds on the story that we are creating of the revenge of nature," Hillcoat said. "We are certainly heightening the environmental threat."

Indeed, the visual references for the film are far closer to the eruption of Mt. St. Helens (whose swath of fallen trees may open the film) than the rubble of the World Trade Center.

"We will create a post-apocalyptic world that is boldly original and present a vision that will captivate and haunt precisely because of its strange echoes of familiarity," Hillcoat wrote in his style notes for the film.

With that in mind, the production filmed not against green screens where invented destruction could be added digitally but around areas of actual urban decay and natural disaster, taking cameras to New Orleans' Lower 9th Ward and slums outside of Pittsburgh. The production even found an abandoned four-lane highway in Pennsylvania to serve as one of the film's central thoroughfares.

The idea was to ground the story in American reality whenever possible rather than where-in-the-world-are-we "Mad Max" fantasy. Hillcoat hoped that one of the film's most distressing images would be a field of snow covered with blood and bloody footprints, inspired by a picture the director saw from a Bosnian Serb slaughter of Muslims.

With so much death, though, audiences may need a little life too, and that's where the relationship between Mortensen and Smit-McPhee will be critical. If the story's father dies before he can bring his son to a safe place, he knows that his young child will at best have to face this unforgiving world alone and at worst suffer a horrible end at someone else's hands.

If the father can somehow remain alive long enough, his son -- and, by extension, the human race -- might just be able to make it. Since the Man (likely a doctor) is dying of some unknown ailment, he needs to know that the Boy will still "carry the fire," as McCarthy memorably put it, and try to build a new and better world in the days and years ahead.

Hillcoat hoped that his movie's closing image will be an extreme close-up of the Boy's face, filled not with dread but optimism. "It's like first contact," Hillcoat says. "You can literally see the wheels of his mind spinning. The human story is what has to be the most intense."

Source: LA Times.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on April 13, 2009, 04:50:55 PM
Someone actually had this posted on IMDB and I thought to post it and share it with everyone. Either this person is passionate and a huge like me who cannot wait for the release he/she really seen the trailer of the movie somewhere.

Discription :

1) The sound of wind blowing, a thick, almost opaque flurry of grayness filling the screen.

2) Zoom back to show snow and ash, the Man and the Boy coming slowly into view.

3) Before all is revealed clearly, a few random voice overs from the film (assming/hopng these lines are in the film) that grow progressively more desperate:

Ely: Where men can't live, gods fare no better.

Boy: What is it, Papa?

Man: Shh. It' oaky.

(at this point, low, almost inaudible moaning that will grow louder with the next lines, the Boy and the Man coming closer into view.

Boy: If they find us, they'll kill us, won't they Papa?

Man: Yes. Yes they will.

Cellar Amputee: Help us, please help us.

Man: Oh, my god.

Moans become cries, shrieks.

Man: Run! We have to run!

(Rapid breathing, crunching fottsteps)

Once the chaotic noises hit a crescendo, all suddenly goes silent.

4) The Man and the Boy, fully in focus walk by the camera, the Man pushing the cart of supplies, his pistol visible, both of them sad, weary, dirty. When they pass, we see what is ahead of them: The long road, forested on either side of them, desolate, gray, dead trees, a long dead car on the side of the road, the gray snow. The screen goes black as our heroes disappear into the tranluscent ash storm.

5)Just as the screen goes black, a startling cymbal sounds. With the original lettering from the book cover are the words: The Road. Over this screen, one final voiceover:

Man: Tell us where the world went.

END

I think that such a trailer would be ambiguous enough to seem horrific. Those of us who read the book and haunt these boards will know better, but try to picture yourself completely ignorant of the novel. What would a trailer like this or similar to this tell you? How would you construct the trailer if it were up to you? Could get interesting.

Not much longer! I can feel it.

Note: I will post my trailer discription soon.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: shadowbender on April 13, 2009, 05:13:48 PM
Not much longer indeed, and if that really is a description of a real trailer, that's really cool. Although I haven't read the book, I've heard a lot of things about it. So yeah, I'll post my view on how the trailer should go later on.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on April 14, 2009, 10:38:34 PM
Ok here is my version of the trailer discription. I want this to be just a teaser trailer and not much dialogue in it.

Here is the discription of my version :

We are looking at the black screen. Background sound is 'Wind', 'Voices' - all of sudden THE MAN wakes up in the dark. We see only his face. Worried, Scared.

CUT TO : Various locations - empty,destroyed streets, allies, highways, snow, ash everywhere.

The Man pushing the cart while The Boy walks next to him. FADE TO BLACK.

On Screen Text/Legend : Based On The Novel By Cormac McCarthy.

Sorrow, sad, dark slow music, may be violin, some piano strings plays - SHOT MOS, Mitout sound - THE MAN comforts THE BOY- they are crying. FADE TO BLACK.

VOICE OVER: Tell Us Where The World Went.

CUT TO: Its the Road, we don't know where it leads though, we pull back just to reveal THE MAN/THE BOY Standing with their CART.

Title up: THE ROAD.

Legend: Fall 2009.

http://www.theroad-movie.com


This is basically the real MUSIC for the movie. Please, check it out. Enjoy it - TOTALY SPOILER FREE..

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qn_fzNWyrFI&NR=1
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Namaste on April 14, 2009, 10:45:31 PM
good visuals..gave me a bit of a shyamalan feel..where you see a few little things here and there but nobody really tells you what's going on.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on April 14, 2009, 10:58:20 PM
good visuals..gave me a bit of a shyamalan feel..where you see a few little things here and there but nobody really tells you what's going on.

Exactly. Did you use the link at the bottom of my trailer discription, Namaste?
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Namaste on April 15, 2009, 11:09:22 PM
nope...tired
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on April 16, 2009, 01:02:33 AM
nope...tired

 ;D You must have not been that tired to write TIRED....
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on April 23, 2009, 07:34:51 PM
The Road: Concept Art



Style Frames for "The Road", a feature film based on Cormac McCarthy's Booker Prize winning novel.

Starring Robert Duvall, Charlize Theron, Viggo Mortenson and Kodi Smit-McPhee.

Directed by John Hillcoat, screenplay by Joe Penhall.

Production Design by Chris Kennedy.

Water colours, pencil sketches and photo montage based on actual location photos

http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/sets/72157604169280010/
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on April 23, 2009, 09:59:47 PM
I hope THE ROAD trailer is attached in front 'Inglorious Basterds'
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: shadowbender on April 25, 2009, 12:56:45 PM
I hope THE ROAD trailer is attached in front 'Inglorious Basterds'

Or hopefully before that.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on April 26, 2009, 08:54:15 PM
I hope THE ROAD trailer is attached in front 'Inglorious Basterds'

Or hopefully before that.

I hope they release the trailer even TOMORROW lol...
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on May 02, 2009, 08:28:09 PM
John Hillcoat?s The Road Finally Gets a New Release Date

Hey, what do you know? looks like one of my most anticipated movies of 2008 is finally going to be released ? in October 2009! John Hillcoat?s adaptation of the Cormac McCarthy novel The Road starring Viggo Mortensen was originally slated for release sometime near the end of last year, with early buzz pegging it as a possible Oscar contender. Then The Weinstein Company hit some financial troubles, Hillcoat asked for a little more time, and they quietly decided to push it back to 2009.

After a long period of radio silence, Rope of Silicon informs us that The Weinstein Co. website has finally updated the official release date to October 16th, 2009. I didn?t quite expect it to take another full year for the movie to hit theatres, but I?m guessing that at this point it?s more a matter of marketing rather than necessity. The summer usually isn?t the right time to release a gritty and bleak post-apocalyptic thriller. Plus, no sense in wasting the Academy Award potential, right? I suppose I should probably be using all this extra time to actually read the book beforehand. What do you say? are you excited about The Road?

Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: shadowbender on May 03, 2009, 12:29:44 PM
Nice! I'll be there on October 16...
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on May 03, 2009, 02:01:07 PM
Nice! I'll be there on October 16...

Same here man. And its closer to the award season. They are saying it will be a top contender. I want Viggo to win Academy, he is a great actor.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on May 12, 2009, 10:18:35 PM
The Road Is the Most Important Movie of the Year SOME SPOILERS

That's the burden carried by an Aussie's adaptation of Cormac McCarthy's beloved novel. Almost no one has seen it. Well, we did. This is interesting... do you have a second?


At one point in The Road, a moment that is never otherwise explained or referenced, the father and the son stare at a dead forest as it burns. The fire leers profanely from one edge of the screen to the other. Dense and hot, certainly loud, it's the sort of fire from which there is no safe distance. It feels like the two of them should get out of there. From the get-go, the father and son have moved. And yet now they stand there watching the fire, dazed, like two drunks gazing out the window of a Laundromat at a mushroom cloud.

Move, guys. Move.

Everything about the film seems disconnected in this way ? shocky and post-traumatic. This is what happens: A father and a son walk from point A to point B through a desolate landscape. Cities are deserted. People-zombies, some of them hungry for human flesh, stare out from abandoned office buildings and sometimes hunt other people. It's always cloudy. Everything is dead. There is no color left in anything ? not the people, not the plants, not the faces of mountains. Ruined, wrecked, used up ? it is our world, consumed at its edges by fire, at its center by rot.

Sounds awful, because it goddamned well is. But it's awful, too, as in full of awe. Awful as in you cannot avert your gaze. It's hard not to watch a fire.

When they do move, the father and the son progress through a quietly seething dream, a world at its end. When they run from danger, they clank and rustle and seem wetly destined to never get away. When the father grips the boy's mouth to quiet him, it is too rough. Rivers seem to be icy sloughs of poison. Yet they swim. They are a father and son. They carry two bullets. Anytime the man turns his back on the boy or separates from him, it feels ? in a way that scary, apocalyptic movies often do ? as if everything will end. But in those movies, the end never really comes. You know that going in, because generally those movies just flirt with the apocalypse, just offer a little look-see at a tidal wave or a nuclear blast.

The Road is no tease. It is a brilliantly directed adaptation of a beloved novel, a delicate and anachronistically loving look at the immodest and brutish end of us all. You want them to get there, you want them to get there, you want them to get there ? and yet you do not want it, any of it, to end.

You should see it for the simplest of reasons: Because it is a good story. Not because it may be important. Not because it is unforgettable, unyielding. Not because it horrifies. Not because the score is creepily spiritual. Not because it is littered with small lines of dialogue you will remember later. Not because it contains warnings against our own demise. All of that is so. Don't see it just because you loved the book. The movie stands alone. Go see it because it's two small people set against the ugly backdrop of the world undone. A story without guarantees. In every moment ? even the last one ? you'll want to know what happens next, even if you can hardly stand to look. Because The Road is a story about the persistence of love between a father and a son, and in that way it's more like a remake of The Godfather than some echo of I Am Legend.

Only this one is different: You won't want to see this one twice.

Consider this little tick of time in the life of The Road, a movie that hundreds of thousands of the book's readers, millions even, are waiting for, if only to vet the film's bleak topography of the ruined nation against the skull carpet of their own imagination: It's the moment when the producer chooses a trailer, itself a defining document for the potential moviegoing nation. This takes place in the offices of the distributor, Dimension Films, and features the huffing presence of one Bob Weinstein, wearing the most wrinkled shirt in the history of modern office life, sitting in his infamous miasma of consternation and excitement, speaking about The Road, which had its release date pushed back one full year last November. Everyone involved ? director, producer, screenwriter ? says there was no secret agenda to that, no worry to be inferred, no doubt on anyone's part about the final product. The movie, which required more than two hundred visual effects to decolorize a landscape stripped of life, simply wasn't ready.

Weinstein acknowledges that loyal readers of Cormac McCarthy's book, which was published in 2006, are probably worried. He's sitting in a conference room in Manhattan, about to pop in a DVD containing two potential trailers. He seems to be figuring out how to talk about the film as he goes, fighting contrary tugs from some internal narrator, giving in only by the slenderest of degrees to the urge to mollify two, three, four different audiences.

First, he calls it a literate action movie. At one point he calls it a zombie movie. Then he starts talking about his kids. "When I had my kids, I was grateful. I was like, Now there's something other to think about than me," he says, and that word ? me ? echoes in the star chamber. "Every parent has that. You don't have to have kids. You're human. If you can't relate to this story, then check your humanity somewhere. I felt this whole relationship with this father and son. Yeah. And yet it was thrilling."

People like to see certain components in movies concerning the end of the world. Asteroids. Alien visitation. Angels. Nuclear war. Tidal waves. Climate change. Giant robots. They seem to like leather. And hopped-up cars. Appearances by God. Buildings blow up, cities fall, in real time. Villains, always villains. Snakes are always good. A beautiful woman. But The Road offers none of that. (Except the last one: Charlize Theron has a supporting role as the mother, breathing a little more fully than her character does in the book, solely as the face of despair.)

Plus, let's face it: The Road does not inherently seem like an asses-in-the-seats proposition. It is adapted from a lyric, repetitive little book, one written in a fashion that nods at classic narrative structure only in its final pages. A book that has found two sorts of readers: the fanatics, who can't put it down, and the frustrated, who find it so dark, blatantly literary, rhythmically voicey, and without hope that they can't turn past page 3. While that doesn't necessarily frame it as a problem movie, it does make things hard to describe in the familiar contours of an X-meets-Y movie pitch. It's fair to wonder whether The Road will become an unimportant footnote in the wake of a best seller. Happens all the time. The Bonfire of the Vanities. Angela's Ashes. And movies mangle literary books, too. They turn arty and inexplicably beloved literary titles ? The English Patient or The Hours ? into arty and pretty forgettable movies. Worse, bad movies routinely make important stories less important. Three years ago, Emilio Estevez single-handedly killed any resurgent interest in the accomplishments of Bobby Kennedy.

"We had a lot of pressure when I went after this book," says producer Nick Wechsler, who pursued and optioned the novel in June 2006, before it was published. "There were other people who made offers, but they weren't large, because they were afraid of the material, obviously. It's very dark stuff. I simply responded to the book. I had no idea that it was going to gain the momentum that it did, become that talked about, that it would win the Pulitzer, get on Oprah. All of a sudden, I could see this was very precious to people, that there was a kind of public trust associated with this book. And we felt incredible pressure on delivering the movie that we felt would be a valid adaptation."

When Wechsler entered the life of The Road, the movie, chances were taken, creating a new interpretative alchemy. He selected a relatively unknown Australian director, John Hillcoat, whose previous feature-film work began and ended with The Proposition, a smallish Australian western starring Guy Pearce ? a decent third-shelf offering at Blockbuster right now. Hillcoat, in turn, hired dark-rocker Nick Cave to compose the score and sought out Joe Penhall, an award-winning but obscure Australian playwright living in London, to write the screenplay. They moved fast ? Penhall and Hillcoat were working on the script even as the book's fervent readership coalesced.

It's clear that Wechsler was toying with expectations even then. "It's a very small bull's-eye, this movie. In all aspects of putting it together, you don't want an audience going into the theater thinking they know what the ride is going to be."

Whatever topical agenda people attach to this film ? global warming, the fall of nationalism, the perils of consumption ? it won't matter. It isn't a vision of the future at all. This is a vision of the end. Like: In the end, there's only one can of Coke. Coke is about to be forgotten. In a collapsing mall, the father digs a single can out of a toppled vending machine. It falls to the floor like a weighty and singular apple. The father opens it and offers it to the boy as a treat. The boy drinks and insists that the father have some, too. They are like that: generous and genuine, even with the last details of a time the boy has never known. But the father gives almost all of it to his son, who stops for a moment, then asks, "Because it's the only one I'll ever have, right?" In that moment, he realizes not only what he has lost, but why his father wants him to have the soda at all. You can see he likes the Coke, too.

"This was a book that was written in a time of prosperity, and we got involved with it in a time of prosperity," says Marc Butan of Mark Cuban's 2929 Productions, which produced the film. "The lens that everyone is viewing through these days is very different. You look at it now and it has a different subtext. It's a count-your-blessings thing now."

Cormac McCarthy fathered a son as an old man, and this story is an ode to a ticking clock, to the diminishment of time, to last chances. Last chance to parent. Last chance to warn, to train, to prepare. The father fights to teach. And the father teaches the boy to fight. In the movie's first teaching moment, the father shows his son where to shoot himself in the head should it come to that. With the gun loaded. It is perhaps the movie's only lurid turn, a moment that, like almost every moment in the movie, appears in the book as well. By the time it occurs, it is understood to be a gesture of necessity. There they are, citizens of a kind of now, bad teeth and all, pallid, filthy, damp to the bone, at their end, and whether you've read the book or not, the sight of it makes you seize.


"It's a love story," Hillcoat says. "So it moves you in a way that is quite unexpected."

It is a love story. But to be clear, it's a love story about a father and a son hauling ass to keep from being eaten by small bands of flannel-shirted cannibals.

It's also a purposefully color-bare apologue of man and boy. The man is played by Viggo Mortensen, and he's in virtually every frame. "The interesting thing about picking an actor for a movie is, you want to try to surpass the audience's knowledge or expectations of what that actor's about," Hillcoat says. "We took a shot with Viggo as opposed to bigger box-office stars. In large part, he's the right choice because, as good as he is, he's still untapped." Mortensen is brilliant in insinuating the father's pain and communicating the hints of loss and his resistance to the inevitable. Burnt and sinewy in each scene, he registers a liquid panic in every glance at the woods and a sort of angry regret in every peek at the boy. Mortensen is a different filthy man in each function of fatherhood. You recognize them all, without voice-over, without undue exposition. He still cares. And it hurts more than ever to care.

Twelve-year-old Kodi Smit-McPhee is beautiful and wretched, luminous and somehow smaller than his age as the boy. But he's full-blown in the part, his character concerned, like all boys, with the contents of his pockets, naturally curious about the few others they encounter ? an old man, an elusive child, a thief, a dog barking at the unseen end of a collapsed mall. Mortensen and Smit-McPhee wrestle for control like any father and son ? in dealing with strangers, in figuring out who's a good guy and who's a bad guy, in matters of privacy, and in the divergent ways they treat others. Elemental #@!*, really. Just some simple old-world parenting, long before people harvested human limbs for Sunday dinner.

The third major cast member of The Road is the setting itself, the world. The film's locations were perhaps the least well-kept secrets in the marketplace of prerelease Web sites about the movie. "Initially we were talking about [filming in] Australia or Iceland," Hillcoat says. "But all of our research took us to looking at images of events like Mount St. Helens, the volcanoes in the Philippines, Hiroshima, Katrina, a set of man-made and natural disasters that have been heavily photographed and filmed. My production designer, sitting in the countryside in Victoria, Australia, found eight miles of abandoned freeway in Pennsylvania on Google Earth, which gave us those dark tunnels. We deliberately used America's real apocalyptic zones. We went to New Orleans to shoot our interior shots in a ruined shopping mall in post-Katrina New Orleans. We used the strip mines in western Pennsylvania. Even billowing clouds in the background of one scene come from 9/11.

"When they pass through a city, there's a shot of two ships sitting on a freeway that looks like a visual effect. That is an actual IMAX 70mm shot taken days after Katrina. We had to doctor the image, grunge it up, make it more toxic, set it into our world, but these places were not hard to find. There's a fair amount of devastation already in the American landscape."

You don't recognize these presences as some timely message from our near past, as heralds of warning. Like the father and son, the scenes ? the forgotten 18-wheeler jackknifed on a freeway bridge, the gas stations littered with useless contraptions, the sinister farmhouses, the sheds with their hand tools piled like ancient contrivances ? all of it calls up the now. Grunged and toxic, sure, but sickeningly familiar. You cannot recognize enough to say where this is, but you recognize it. All of it.


When Bob Weinstein rolls those trailers, each one assumes the predictable arc of a story compressed to its essence. There is a speed to them that the actual movie ? which I saw before seeing the trailers ? does not possess or seek to possess, an urgency that feels manufactured. The music is pulse-pounding and urgent, driven to create absurd expectations of action in a movie that quietly elicits worry about the relative friability of the invisible paths that exist between people and what they need. Still, every utterance, every cry for help or hand clasped across the mouth of the boy to suppress a sob, is a fair-enough emanation from the heart of the movie.

The odd thing is, the start of each trailer includes glimpses of a storm, panicky news footage, little puzzle pieces of the world before it ended. No one ? not the director or the myriad producers, not the novelist or the screenwriter ? had ever even hinted at how it happened, until this.

For someone who loves the book, for anyone who knows the story going in, this is a moment you hoped would never come. Why remind us of the reductive logic of cause and effect? Before the question can be asked, Weinstein stands up, offers his hand, and says, "Okay, we're going with the first one." He gives no rationale. And so it seems the metonymic references to the national news, to the weather, to presumed military conflicts laid in as a tonally quiet explanation of what is never known in book or movie, for now will stay in the trailer.

On the other side of the planet, at home in Australia, Hillcoat's been hearing about these trailers. "We're so conditioned by postapocalyptic films to be centered on a big event, and they become this high-concept thing. And here there's this total absence, this negation of explanation. We have to stay with that. So yeah. That's gonna be a challenge."

In good times or in #@!* times, you can ask why people go to see movies at all. The Road may be a kind of historical countertwitch to Depression-era Busby Berkeley musicals, to a time when people used movie theaters as places to forget. (Although how a kaleidoscopic mess like 42nd Street ever generated hope in 1933 is baffling.) But make no mistake, hit or miss, The Road, a risky, dyspeptic, and serious road movie, will be easy to lampoon, to dismiss, to skip. Unwary couples will walk out. Teenagers in search of the comfort nipple of cinematic apocalypse, with its blank-slate promise and its tinny hope for a new tomorrow, will roll their eyes. Bill Hader is probably writing the SNL skit right now.

The other certainty is that everyone involved in this movie is working against the predictable imperatives of perhaps the most predictable movie genre of them all: the apocalyptic thriller. The great experiment of the movie is that it hangs on nothing if not the subversion of the conventions of the genre. These people want the same thing from The Road that Busby Berkeley wanted, the same thing any artist with a sense of urgency wants. They want for people to walk out of the theater feeling it in their chest plate. They want them to say, perhaps for reasons they cannot consciously fathom, to everyone they know: You have to see it. Really.

You do. Not because it's grim, not because it's depressing, or even scary. The Road is all of those things, both acutely and chronically. But there was not a single stupid choice made in turning this book into this movie. No wrongheaded lyric tribute to the novel. No moment engineered simply to make you jump.

The terror of it is in a normal world made vacant. There is a surprising terror in a landscape of farmhouses full of possessions that have no function, a remarkable danger in a pile of old hammers, in the possibility of forgetting what things were once for. It's a fear worth feeling. And there is something knotty and resilient, eternal and elemental, something worth caring about in all this, in a parent's love for a child, especially when love is the only thing left in the world that has the least little thread of purpose.

That's their world, bleak and empty as it might be. Ours, too.

The Road opens this fall.


Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on May 12, 2009, 10:27:32 PM
The above article I think is the 2nd or the 3rd positive review. I just can't wait anymore for the trailer. There is something going on between the studio and the author of the book. Cormac did not agree with one of the trailers.

Evidently the author of the piece was meeting with Bob Weinstein as he was watching and deciding between two possible trailers for the movie, and the trailer that was picked by him for release includes some snippets of news footage that supposedly occur before the story even begins (that seem to hint at what causes the catastrophe--which had definitely never been conclusively stated in the book at all). Apparantly Dimension Films feels it will "help" the film if they include these clues at the beginning of the trailer just so audiences will know they are about to see a preview for a film about the end of the world. The author further goes on to say he discussed this approach with Hillcoat, who sounds like he didn't sound too enthralled with this strategy, but it's unclear whether or not these clips are actually in the final cut of the movie, or whether Hillcoat decided to omit them. My guess is if they actually are in the film, they're probably inserted somewhere within the augmented scenes between the Man and Wife (Charlize Theron).

I personaly don't have any problem with the trailer. The purpose of a trailer is to help bring people into the theater. Sometimes, trailers have content that isn't in the movie. I don't have a serious problem with the trailer showing the initial confusion over the catastrophe; I just hope they don't specify the actual catastrophe.  

Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Dr Malcolm Crowe on May 14, 2009, 03:20:59 PM
trailer:

http://movies.yahoo.com/premieres/13468916/standardformat/
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on May 14, 2009, 09:36:38 PM
Holy Holy, I have been waiting for this forever. ever. Ever....ever... finally it is out... looks so so so AWESOME.... just like the book...
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Namaste on May 14, 2009, 10:15:18 PM
Looks pretty good. 
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on May 14, 2009, 10:33:20 PM
Looks pretty good. 

I know. Looks closely realistic like the book. Except the first part of the trailer was made for production so audience could get the idea from it.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: shadowbender on May 16, 2009, 08:13:20 PM
I saw the trailer yesterday, and I'm very impressed. Really looking forward to this.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on May 16, 2009, 10:28:23 PM
I saw the trailer yesterday, and I'm very impressed. Really looking forward to this.

This movie is going to be a great movie.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on June 09, 2009, 02:09:16 PM
I have been reading on the net that it was a bad decision by the studios on making the book into the movie. They are saying it for various reasons, such as it won't make much money, or it's too depressing.

I don't know how many people care about this movie here in this forum, but whoever read the book like I did will understand the importance of the message behind the book. It is powerful and reiterate that this is a very important book for us. It will show us that how important the world is for us.

Some people won't get it that the goal of this movie isn't to make a killing at the box office, it's to put out a message to the world. Maybe you haven't come to terms with the fact that we are not permanent fixtures on this planet - there will be an end to civilization someday. It's uplifting to me, to know that love and hope can still exist at the end of it all. I can't think of a better time for this movie to come out, being that we are in the middle of a recession and all. I think it will force people to really look at what's important in life, and be thankful for everything we have.

Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: shadowbender on June 15, 2009, 04:21:24 PM
There was one person comparing "The Road" to the video game "Fallout 3", with all of the abandoned places, the wasteland, cannibals, etc. If you like "The Road", then you should check out Fallout.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Namaste on June 15, 2009, 06:05:09 PM
I've heard good things about fallout.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on June 15, 2009, 06:21:54 PM
I know and I have never heard about fallout. Is it a video game or a movie. I am serious.  ::)
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Namaste on June 15, 2009, 10:23:46 PM
It started out as a PC RPG with some semi-real-time battle scenarios, but I believe it may have come out for Xbox as well..don't quote me on that, though.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on June 16, 2009, 10:43:18 AM
I read an article online in regards to the locations they scouted for shooting THE ROAD. There is a scene with a ship on the freeway. It is also shown in the trailer which was released few weeks ago. The makers stated that the ship scene is set in New Orleans and it is not a computer magic - it was due to the Hurricane Katrina.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: shadowbender on June 19, 2009, 05:25:09 PM
It started out as a PC RPG with some semi-real-time battle scenarios, but I believe it may have come out for Xbox as well..don't quote me on that, though.

Yeah, Fallout 1 and 2 started out as PC games, they were about the apocalypse. Fallout 3 is a video game that was released on Xbox 360, Playstation 3, and PC last year. It revolves around a retro world set in the future, but still has a 50's type theme to it. A Nuclear War has raged on, and the world turns into a Wasteland. Most people go into underground vaults, where they live life safely from the radiation and dangers of the outside world/wasteland. In the game you build your own character, a person who was born in Vault 101. Your mother has died giving birth to you, and live with your father (Who's played by LIAM NEESON. Awesome.). But suddenly, when your father goes missing, you must leave the Vault and enter the Wasteland in order to find him. You encounter dangerous creatures, whom you must fight, and must choose to be good or evil. The game is amazing with it's great way of storytelling, cinematic and awesome action gameplay, and revolves deeply on the power of choice. Highly recommend anyone with a 360, PS3, or PC should buy it. One of the best games I've ever played.

Did I mention the game stars Liam Neeson?!?! And there are narrations by Ron Perlman! Yes.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Namaste on June 29, 2009, 04:34:47 PM
I read an article online in regards to the locations they scouted for shooting THE ROAD. There is a scene with a ship on the freeway. It is also shown in the trailer which was released few weeks ago. The makers stated that the ship scene is set in New Orleans and it is not a computer magic - it was due to the Hurricane Katrina.

LOL I remember the boats in the streets downtown here in Charleston after hurricane Hugo (1989)
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on June 29, 2009, 06:06:37 PM
I read an article online in regards to the locations they scouted for shooting THE ROAD. There is a scene with a ship on the freeway. It is also shown in the trailer which was released few weeks ago. The makers stated that the ship scene is set in New Orleans and it is not a computer magic - it was due to the Hurricane Katrina.

LOL I remember the boats in the streets downtown here in Charleston after hurricane Hugo (1989)

That's crazy. I did some research to find some pictures of NEW ORLEANs distruction after (HC). I found lots water. I wanted to see that ship they shot in the movie.

Which state do you live in, Namaste?
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Namaste on June 29, 2009, 06:30:55 PM
South Carolina


here's one of the pics http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.csmonitor.com/photosoftheday/specials/hurricanes/images/2.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.csmonitor.com/photosoftheday/index.php%3Fimage%3D2%26date%3Dspecials/hurricanes&usg=__viebEDWgkGRuRjZ11WCuJ6IqzPk=&h=403&w=600&sz=85&hl=en&start=46&um=1&tbnid=lNoySMcCPjRepM:&tbnh=91&tbnw=135&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dhurricane%2Bhugo%2Bcharleston%26ndsp%3D20%26hl%3Den%26sa%3DN%26start%3D40%26um%3D1%26ie%3DUTF-8
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on June 29, 2009, 10:22:13 PM
South Carolina


here's one of the pics http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.csmonitor.com/photosoftheday/specials/hurricanes/images/2.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.csmonitor.com/photosoftheday/index.php%3Fimage%3D2%26date%3Dspecials/hurricanes&usg=__viebEDWgkGRuRjZ11WCuJ6IqzPk=&h=403&w=600&sz=85&hl=en&start=46&um=1&tbnid=lNoySMcCPjRepM:&tbnh=91&tbnw=135&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dhurricane%2Bhugo%2Bcharleston%26ndsp%3D20%26hl%3Den%26sa%3DN%26start%3D40%26um%3D1%26ie%3DUTF-8

Thanks. That's powerful. Pictures says to me that impact was uniquely and magically powerful. Thanks for sharing, Namaste.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: shadowbender on June 30, 2009, 01:34:06 PM
Nice pics.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on June 30, 2009, 10:22:15 PM
I think they are going to update the official website now. Try to go to the website it directs you to the Weinstein website.

http://www.theroad-movie.com
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on July 31, 2009, 01:01:10 PM
Positive Review :

?The Road? is finally here.

The John Hillcoat movie based on the bestseller by Cormac McCarthy is finally being shown, slowly, to a handful of people. Scheduled for last year but then held because special effects weren?t ready, ?The Road? will surface in October.

?The Road? comes from the Dimension side of the Weinstein Company, not always my favorite place. It was home earlier this year to the dreadful ?Soul Men.? But ?The Road? was also made by another group, Mark Cuban?s 2929 Productions. It was acquired by Dimension, but really seems like a regular Weinstein movie.

Hillcoat has done justice to McCarthy?s Pulitzer Prize winner. ?The Road? is elegiac and moving, artful and yet suspenseful. No, it?s not a raucous good time. It can be thoughtful and grim. But here?s the interesting thing: Viggo Mortensen?s performance as a father walking through a post-apocalypse America with his young son is just fascinating. It stays with you long after leaving the theater. Mortensen is that good.

There aren?t a lot of other actors in ?The Road.? Charlize Theron is very good as Viggo?s wife, in flashbacks. Both Robert Duvall and Guy Pearce make cameo appearances. Eleven-year-old (he?s 13 now) Kodi Smit-McPhee is just right as the couple?s son.

What Hillcoat and screenwriter Joe Penhall do is accurately capture McCarthy?s tone and lauguage. This isn?t easy to do. ?The Road? is a bleak trip, told in muted blacks, blues, and grays. There are no blue skies after whatever caused the apocalypse (is it nuclear war? we don?t know. Everything left, including the trees, is dying.)

So what Dimension will have to do is establish an audience for ?The Road.? It opens wide in October, rather than platform the release. This should work just in getting the curious in all at once. Mortensen will be on a lot of top 10 and awards lists, and that should help, too. Depending on how the year shakes out, he could be a formidable contender.

?The Road? also has a cult quality, which could add to its mystery. The hold up from last year was to finish the effects, and they were well worth it. A whole city is painted out to reflect destruction. The sky is a miserable, darkening entity. But the scenes I liked best were ones where Mortensen takes his son back to the home he grew up in ? now abandoned. Hillcoat has made a little piece of art. You can?t ask for much more than that.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on August 24, 2009, 06:23:23 PM
The pictures.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/tags/theroad/
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: marco on August 31, 2009, 05:55:53 PM
Lol,this topic has been here for months and I didn't even know what was about.
Now that I'm reading the book and know about the movie they're making,I've entered it and found the TRAILER!! :o
This movie looks awesome!I read somewhere that it'll be presented in Venice,these days.I'll stay tuned.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on August 31, 2009, 06:12:18 PM
Lol,this topic has been here for months and I didn't even know what was about.
Now that I'm reading the book and know about the movie they're making,I've entered it and found the TRAILER!! :o
This movie looks awesome!I read somewhere that it'll be presented in Venice,these days.I'll stay tuned.

Are you serious about this?
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: marco on September 01, 2009, 04:39:10 AM
Lol,this topic has been here for months and I didn't even know what was about.
Now that I'm reading the book and know about the movie they're making,I've entered it and found the TRAILER!! :o
This movie looks awesome!I read somewhere that it'll be presented in Venice,these days.I'll stay tuned.

Are you serious about this?

Of course.Why do you ask me?
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on September 01, 2009, 10:14:02 AM
Lol,this topic has been here for months and I didn't even know what was about.
Now that I'm reading the book and know about the movie they're making,I've entered it and found the TRAILER!! :o
This movie looks awesome!I read somewhere that it'll be presented in Venice,these days.I'll stay tuned.

Are you serious about this?

Of course.Why do you ask me?

I am a little surprised cause the buzz is everywhere about THE ROAD being one of the most important films of the year.

I have been following every little news about this movie. Yes, it is going to be filmed in Venice.

what do you think of the BOOK and the conflict?

Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: marco on September 01, 2009, 11:34:10 AM
I don't know,I've started getting information about it only recently.
However,I've only read 30 pages of the book,so it's a little bit early to give a proper comment about it.The only thing I can say is that McCarthy has a very particular way of writing,but I'm getting used at it.
What do you mean with the conflict?  ???
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on September 01, 2009, 06:25:11 PM
I don't know,I've started getting information about it only recently.
However,I've only read 30 pages of the book,so it's a little bit early to give a proper comment about it.The only thing I can say is that McCarthy has a very particular way of writing,but I'm getting used at it.
What do you mean with the conflict?  ???

I thought you already finished the book. I agree McCarthy's style of writing is unique. I wanted to know what you think about the book and the issue that the author is presenting. I am not going to spoil it, finish it and then you will know what I am talking about.

Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on September 04, 2009, 03:46:19 PM
Viggo and Mcphee talks.

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/n/a/2009/09/03/entertainment/e113029D83.DTL
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on September 04, 2009, 10:40:47 PM
12 Minute Footage.

http://www.collider.com/2009/09/04/5-movie-clips-from-director-john-hillcoats-the-road-12-minutes-of-footage/
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Namaste on September 07, 2009, 06:04:09 AM
the clips get progressively better from first to last, for the most part. (i think the second-to-last was the best)
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on September 07, 2009, 02:59:58 PM
The one with the old man is touching. My favorite clip.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Namaste on September 07, 2009, 03:25:36 PM
viggo's reaction shots painted the old man as creepy  :x
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on September 08, 2009, 10:04:35 AM
viggo's reaction shots painted the old man as creepy  :x

I agree. What makes me satisfied about that is how John Hillcoat showed the scenes exactly how it is described in the book.

When you reach to the part of the old man meets THE MAN and THE BOY. This particular part of the book was written poetically. You will be impressed by every single dialogue. Even though its shorter, but it has that painfull and meaninful meaning to it.

Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on September 08, 2009, 11:56:51 AM
A positive Venice Reviews : Note: Light Spolers



http://boxoffice.com/reviews/2009/09/the-road.php

Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on September 08, 2009, 12:10:15 PM
I am sorry I had to post this review as well. Majority of the reviews and comments are coming positive. Only Variety so far gave it a negative review which I don't get why they are different than the rest of the critics. Again I don't know how Variety praised NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN.

Here we go one more review : SPOILER in the first paragraph. An Introduction for the characters, I would recommend to read it.

Just before the kid was born, the world burned. We don't know why, and the characters don't talk about it -- perhaps they don't quite know themselves, or maybe they've decided that it no longer matters. The Boy's universe is grey, full of ash, dust, and the ruins of a civilization he never saw. This is all he knows. His mother, seeing no point in going on, killed herself shortly after his birth. She was not alone. Many of those who didn't take their own lives were soon murdered by the desperate and hungry.

Skip ahead nine or ten years. The kid and his father wander the barren roadways heading south toward the coast for no clear reason other than that it gives them a tangible goal toward which to strive. (And there's always the hope that the ocean will be something other than gray.) Every day is a knock-down, drag-out fight for survival. They run, hide, starve, and fight off attackers who want their food, or their clothes, or, at one point, their flesh.

I set the stage like this not to horrify you or to gross you out, but to give you a sense of the relentless, pervasive grimness of The Road -- and then to turn around and say that The Road may be the most profoundly optimistic and life-affirming film you will see this year. Those who have read Cormac McCarthy's novel of the same name won't be surprised by this. John Hillcoat's faithful, near-perfect adaptation beautifully captures McCarthy's synthesis of all-encompassing darkness and enduring hope.


The father (Viggo Mortensen) and the son (Kodi Smit-McPhee) are driven -- kept alive, really -- by different things. For the Man, the Boy is all that matters. "The child is my warrant," he tells us in mournful voiceover. "And if he is not the word of God, then God never spoke."

What keeps the Boy going is the notion that, in a world of murderers and thieves, he and his dad are the Good Guys. They're "carrying the fire." When they pass friendly, desperate wanderers, the Boy pesters his father to donate some food. When dad decides to strip and abandon a man who tried to steal their possessions, the boy begs him to stop. It is here that McCarthy and Hillcoat begin to reveal their fundamentally positive view of human nature. The murderers and thieves are trying to recapture, by whatever means necessary, remnants of the world they used to know. The Boy is more or less a clean slate, and his empathy and kindness are instinctive, innate.

The Road is unremittingly focused on the Man and the Boy. This is not really an "apocalyptic thriller," though it has genre elements, and plenty of suspense. The father will do anything to protect his son, including putting a bullet in the Boy's brain if it comes to that. The Boy is the father's sole reason for carrying on, but the reverse is not true. It's really the Boy who's "carrying the fire." He is humanity, in every sense.

Viggo Mortensen is excellent here, but The Road is anchored by Kodi Smit-McPhee, whose performance is staggering in both its force and its surprising, artful understatement. I don't know how it's even possible to get a performance like this in a role this demanding and intense (he's in all but a few scenes) from an 11-year old boy -- who, by the way, is from Australia and is all the while doing a beautiful American accent. The 11-year olds I've known couldn't sit still for long enough to watch a movie, never mind make one. (An aside: Smit-McPhee was awesome during the post-screening Q&A, too, quickly improvising a charming answer to a rambling non-question from moderator Ken Burns.)

The ending, which brought me to tears, is not merely optimistic or hopeful -- it is uplifting, and the uplift is earned. The movie is a moving gesture of faith in our species. Doomsaying about the fate of mankind is as old as civilization: wrath of the Gods, nuclear war, global warming, what have you. The Road insists that we're going to be okay -- and I think I believe it.

Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: marco on September 09, 2009, 05:39:09 AM
From what I heard,it seems that this movie was not appreciated in Venice.Let's see what happens..
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Dr Malcolm Crowe on September 09, 2009, 04:13:44 PM
It got pushed back again. This time to Thanksgiving.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on September 09, 2009, 06:37:13 PM
I am getting pissed. Screw Weinstein. What's wrong with this people? Pushed to Nov 25th release now?

Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: marco on September 10, 2009, 08:18:10 AM
I read somewhere that the reason why they're doing this is because of the negativity of the movie itself.I Don't know,it could be true,but I don't get why posticipating  ??? It doesn't make sense to me.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on September 10, 2009, 02:20:13 PM
I don't think there will be any negative mark in the movie. What you read is probably what they are thinking. I read an article posted in the IMDB forums that the reason behind the Nov 25th release is that its currently playing in Film Festivals and also Weinsteins wants to get the movie closer to Oscars.




Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on September 11, 2009, 10:09:07 AM
Put 'The Road' back on your Oscar contender ballot NO SPOILERS.

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/the_big_picture/2009/09/put-the-road-back-on-your-oscar-contender-ballot.html
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on September 11, 2009, 11:27:40 AM
AICN review. QUINT is IMPRESSED.

http://www.aintitcool.com/node/42272
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on September 13, 2009, 03:14:05 PM
The Best Movies from Toronto Film Festival

Alex here, from the Toronto International Film Festival, getting ready to go to bed at 4am to wake up at 7am to go watch more movies and interview more people. But before I do, I wanted to share the top three films that I consider to be the best at the festival.

We will have the full reviews for these and many other movies from TIFF as soon as we get back. But for now, check out my picks below and feel free to ask any question that you may have.

* The Road: The film recently was pushed back for the third time to November 25th. Many fans have speculated that it must be trash since it keeps getting delayed. Not so. The reason for the new November date, is to get it ready for the awards season.

This is easily the best movie at the Toronto Film Festival and is not only well-made, but has some of the most disturbing scenes I have ever witnessed (people around me were covering their faces in horror). Viggo Mortensen's performance is definitely Oscar-worthy and so is John Hillcoat's directing. Do yourself a favor, see this movie as soon as it becomes available. And be ready to cry, scream and enjoy yourself.


Note : What happened to all the members, this forum looks dead.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Namaste on September 14, 2009, 12:55:45 AM
I'm reading, just don't have anything worthwhile to say.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on September 14, 2009, 11:55:37 AM
I'm reading, just don't have anything worthwhile to say.

 ;D - what do you think of the reviews so far, Namaste?
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on September 14, 2009, 08:52:52 PM
New York Times Article Reports Some Bad Behavior by Bob Weinstein
Not much later, as it happened, a lesson in the bloody business of undoing myths played out in the mezzanine lobby of the Sutton Place hotel, where the press was gathering for a session about ?The Road,? from the Weinstein Company.

Full in front of six or seven reporters who were working near the festival press office, Bob Weinstein, the company?s co-founder, gave some very loud marching orders to Viggo Mortensen and others involved with ?The Road.? Tell the press to stop with this business of calling the movie ?long-delayed,? shouted Mr. Weinstein. ?Even the guys who like the movie say ?long-delayed ?Road,? ?bleak ?Road.?? It?s almost like it?s got to be stopped. Like, this is enough.?

Mr. Weinstein stopped to say a cheerful hello after the obscenity-laced pep talk. ?I?ve got 20 films coming up,? he said.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on September 14, 2009, 08:55:33 PM
[TIFF Review] The Road (8.5 out of 10)

What a long road it has been. The cinematic adaptation of the praised Cormac McCarthy novel certainly has hit many speed bumps. After a year long delay, it has finally arrived. Faithful to the novel, John Hillcoat has crafted an austerely dark look at the bleak voyage of a father and son. While this is the furthest from the feel-good film of the year one can get, Hillcoat?s take is approaching impeccable beauty. There are moments of sheer suspense, desperation, and pure heartache.

It is the not so distant future and humanity is nearly extinct. The film follows a father (Viggo Mortensen) and a son (Kodi Smit-McPhee) on a journey south to find hope. Their relationship is handled exquisitely throughout the film. There are also a few flashbacks with their mother (Charlize Theron). Her performance is a mixed bag, as her motivations are unknown and quite underdeveloped. John Hillcoat is the real star here. Through staggering visuals and a keen sense of when to push the boundaries, the film glides along with elegance. It goes to many dark, dismal places making me very curious on how this performs at the box office come Thanksgiving. There is barely a glimmer of hope for the entire two hours. One of the main highlights during the adventure is a supporting role by the barely recognizable Robert Duvall. His role is very small, but a specific scene with Mortensen?s character is one of the best of the film. The score by Nick Cave and Warren Ellis is astounding. From the mesmerizing introduction piano theme to the swelling end, the haunting score fuses with precision. The film is certainly not for everyone, but those who can handle the dreadfully dreary tale, will find something to love and contemplate with The Road.

8.5 out of 10
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on September 14, 2009, 09:00:36 PM
Press Conference: Video. THE ROAD. TORONTO INTNL FILM FESTIVAL.

I know I am keep posting, but I am superly pumped up about this movie. I cannot wait.

http://www.vvcnetwork.ca/tiff09/20090913/20090913-theroad/
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Namaste on September 15, 2009, 12:41:54 AM
I'm reading, just don't have anything worthwhile to say.

 ;D - what do you think of the reviews so far, Namaste?

well i don't read the ones with spoilers, but so far it seems pretty positive. I heard it's really disturbing..so that's a plus, lol  ;D
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on September 15, 2009, 11:50:42 AM
I'm reading, just don't have anything worthwhile to say.

 ;D - what do you think of the reviews so far, Namaste?

well i don't read the ones with spoilers, but so far it seems pretty positive. I heard it's really disturbing..so that's a plus, lol  ;D

Yep, the story is disturbing.  ;D
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on September 15, 2009, 01:24:39 PM
I was just on Rotten Tomatoes website. They aggregate the critics rating at 86%. This is impressive.

Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on September 15, 2009, 01:31:59 PM
The book I read and then I cherished is turned into a movie now. 10 out of 10 - Review - Little Spoiler.


Rating: 10 out of 10

This is only the second time I?ve given a score of 10 for a film, and this one receives this honor almost solely on the fact it?s taken me five jangly hours to get over just how stupendously brutal this hyper-realistic film is, and how deeply we?ve all misjudged the apparent strength of society and culture.

Based on the highly-acclaimed 2007 Cormac McCarthy novel of the same name, The Road is a sort of philosophic horror film with a slightly optimistic ending. The topic under discussion ultimately may be about the survival of humans in general, but it certainly is about the survival of any kind of humanity in a world where force and cunning and paranoia rule. This multi-level story gives us two things to think about: the post-apocalyptic world is an environmental disaster; the post-apocalyptic world invites only the most basic emotions. The former is the setting, the latter the drama.

Here?s how it comes together: a stupendous cataclysm rocks the earth. All birds and animals are dead, as are all trees and plant life. Every day is grey, and getting greyer. It?s cold, and getting colder. It doesn?t take a genius to deduce this is either a nuclear winter, or the aftermath of a huge, unexpected meteor crash. Not good. Through a seamless flow of action shots and flashbacks, usually told in unsettled dreams, we discover our heroes -- an unnamed man and his son -- are heading along a road that will take them to the east coast of the southern US. It?s about 10-12 years after the disaster, and they can no longer stay at their northern home. Mom committed suicide sometime after the boy?s birth, which coincided with the catastrophe. Not surprisingly, travel is dangerous because society has had a long time to break down, and the road is patrolled by roving bands of militia and the woods by gangs of cannibals. Not a friendly situation. However, like any good road movie, our team of ?good guys? slowly make their way along and one by one encounter situations dangerous, emotionally moving, humorous, and philosophic as their journey progresses.

The main action, however, is between father and son, not between toy soldiers on trucks and Texas chainsaw cannibals hiding in country mansions. Dad is in full survival mode, but the son, who really hasn?t seen anyone outside of his father, is naturally friendly and trusting, and what we hear between these two as the story progresses is a combination of verbal pact-making and lessons from dad on how to be paranoid and if necessary, suicidal. Their gun only has one bullet left, and the son will be the one to get it if they are ever caught? by anyone. This bleak instruction proves both undoable and ultimately unnecessary, but it shows the heights ? or depths ? to which a father will go to protect his son from any possible atrocities in a lawless world. That?s their theme ? they represent humanity in a devolved inhumane culture, a society based on warlords, on instinct, on the brutal acts the madness of starvation can bring. The movie?s question is: how long can it last?

The second theme ? a killer environment ? is the story?s continual backdrop of lightning-riddled clouds, endless rain, dead forests, dead everything, all covered with a mortuary-white layer of pervasive ash. Years without the sun has killed everything. No philosophy here, folks. Just the most visually depressing earth you?ll ever see and a stunning visualization of what happens with the failure of the interdependent ecosystem. And it could happen. Lesson over.

The acting is generally superb, and why not, with Viggo Mortensen as the father, Charlize Theron as the wife, and Kodi Smit-McPhee as the boy. Mortensen is great as the dying dad, subtly moving from simply protective to desperately concerned as the road continually leads nowhere good and his health is failing. He knows his son is not yet hardened against humanity, but he?s also torn by fears of pushing him into the crazy paranoid abyss. Mortensen expresses these conflicts beautifully an offers up a truly believable and compelling performance of a man in a truly cruel situation. Theron, unfortunately, plays the depressed mother ? ?I lost my heart when he was born? ? and only appears in the father?s dream flashbacks. Her big scene is the walking out into the night suicide moment, and otherwise she lounges around in eye candy casual wear as dad dreams of their early days. She also represents those who simply give up, who see death as a salvation, not something to be feared in the face of the really fearsome. Smit-McPhee is surprisingly good as the son. He, too, becomes a different person by the end of the story ? in some ways, his own person ? and this change from kid to young adult is well done. One of the surprising cameos is Robert Duval, who appears briefly in the only named role as Eli. Plastered in makeup as to make him virtually unrecognizable, only the voice remains in this one humorous instance in the story. Eli is the first to receive human concern from the boy, however, and dad?s initial rejection of this generosity reveals not only his depth of inhumanity, but the first instance of moral opposition from the boy. An interesting scene.

Director John Hillcoat works wonders with Joe Penhall?s adaptation of McCarthy?s novel. The action moves ahead briskly, we?re not bogged down by too many or too long father-son pact scenes, and the use of flashbacks is superb, worked in as they are as the father?s dreams and daydreams, adroitly filling in the space between endless grey light. The Road?s two hours fly by effortlessly as Hillcoat drags you into this hopeless otherworld and continually beats you with increasing despair. You find yourself asking: would I put up with this?

The camerawork is divine. Shot at a number of incredibly visual locations, including the very Ballardian abandoned Pennsylvania Turnpike, the road they travel is dotted with death and destruction, rotted corpses, abandoned cities, all the detritus of a land scavenged to death. The feel is very gritty, cold and grey ? perfect foil for the hot and dangerous humans still left alive.

The Road. It?s a trip nobody would ever want to take. Is Culture a mask? Yes. Is Society a form of trust? Yes. Can both survive a devolution to the instinctual level? Perhaps. The ending is a sort of test of your optimism meter. I?m betting your needle goes way too high. Not a good plan when the dust comes down. See this amazing movie if you can? it?s The Road into choices from hell.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: marco on September 19, 2009, 05:27:11 AM
That's a very good story.I hope the movie will be as close to it as possible.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on September 19, 2009, 10:33:00 PM
That's a very good story.I hope the movie will be as close to it as possible.

They screened for Cormac McCarthy the auther of the book. He approved it. He was satisfied.

The only thing that he was unhappy with  was the TRAILER. If you noticed at the beginning they show Floods, fires, Hurricanes and tornadoes. He was deeply saddened. Studio had to explain it him that it was all added for promotional reasons.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: marco on September 20, 2009, 05:45:33 AM
That's a very good story.I hope the movie will be as close to it as possible.

They screened for Cormac McCarthy the auther of the book. He approved it. He was satisfied.

The only thing that he was unhappy with  was the TRAILER. If you noticed at the beginning they show Floods, fires, Hurricanes and tornadoes. He was deeply saddened. Studio had to explain it him that it was all added for promotional reasons.

Yeah,I can imagine.In the book he almost never mention what really happened.But I think the producers are right: you have to show something to move people to the theatre.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on September 21, 2009, 02:17:42 PM
That's a very good story.I hope the movie will be as close to it as possible.

They screened for Cormac McCarthy the auther of the book. He approved it. He was satisfied.

The only thing that he was unhappy with  was the TRAILER. If you noticed at the beginning they show Floods, fires, Hurricanes and tornadoes. He was deeply saddened. Studio had to explain it him that it was all added for promotional reasons.

Yeah,I can imagine.In the book he almost never mention what really happened.But I think the producers are right: you have to show something to move people to the theatre.

Now people are waiting for the site to be updated and also a new trailer. It's this years NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN as far as reviews are concerned.

Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: marco on September 22, 2009, 05:09:31 AM
That's a very good story.I hope the movie will be as close to it as possible.

They screened for Cormac McCarthy the auther of the book. He approved it. He was satisfied.

The only thing that he was unhappy with  was the TRAILER. If you noticed at the beginning they show Floods, fires, Hurricanes and tornadoes. He was deeply saddened. Studio had to explain it him that it was all added for promotional reasons.

Yeah,I can imagine.In the book he almost never mention what really happened.But I think the producers are right: you have to show something to move people to the theatre.

Now people are waiting for the site to be updated and also a new trailer. It's this years NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN as far as reviews are concerned.



I hope it'll be better.I didn't like that movie so much  :-\
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on September 22, 2009, 11:10:46 AM
No Country For Old Men is Classic     
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on September 22, 2009, 10:31:16 PM
Official Soundtrack Sneak Peek

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mopKOdrjspg
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on September 23, 2009, 09:59:26 PM
Trailer 2 - Fan Made

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8CwJHxEQ0WA&feature=player_embedded#t=28
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on October 09, 2009, 08:58:29 PM
A terrifying paragraph from the book. If you want to read it - what do you think? I've read the book many times and everytime I reach to this paragraph I have to read it over and over again. It's mind blowing.

"They began to come upon from time to time small cairns of rock by the roadside. They were signs in gypsy language, lost patterans. The first he'd seen in some while, common in the north, leading out of the looted and exhausted cities, hopeless messages to loved ones lost and dead. By then all stores of food had given out and murder was everywhere upon the land. The world soon to be largely populated by men who would eat your children in front of your eyes and the cities themselves held in cores of blackened looters who tunneled among the ruins and crawled from the rubble white of tooth and eye carrying charred and anonymous tins of food in nylon nets like shoppers in the commissaries of hell. The soft black talc blew through the streets like squid ink uncoiling along a sea floor and the cold crept down and the dark came early and the scavengers passing down the steep canyons with their torches trod silky holes in the drifted ash that closed behind them silently as eyes. Out on the roads the pilgrims sank down and fell over and died and the bleak and shrouded earth went trundling past the sun and returned again as trackless and as unremarked as the path of any nameless sisterworld in the ancient dark beyond."
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on October 10, 2009, 05:16:26 PM
The official site is updated - launched.

http://www.theroad-movie.com
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on October 19, 2009, 10:35:11 PM
Great interview with some great footage. Looks awesome.



http://www.channel4.com/news/articles/arts_entertainment/film_tv/viggo+mortensen+on+the+road/3388602
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on October 31, 2009, 01:12:14 AM
Trailer 2

http://movies.yahoo.com/movie/1810037227/video/16377428
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Namaste on November 04, 2009, 01:16:58 AM
interesting. Not the typical hollywood production
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: dana on November 04, 2009, 10:47:04 AM
I was able to read "The Road" and "I am Legend" on the way to St. Louis this summer.  Stepped out of the truck, heard a crow, and broke my shoe.  lol (not really)  Mentioned both books out loud on the phone, saw a spider, asked a question, let a spider go, went swinging, woke up with bruises, etc, etc.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: mamasan on November 04, 2009, 08:13:16 PM
I was able to read "The Road" and "I am Legend" on the way to St. Louis this summer.  Stepped out of the truck, heard a crow, and broke my shoe.  lol (not really)  Mentioned both books out loud on the phone, saw a spider, asked a question, let a spider go, went swinging, woke up with bruises, etc, etc.

Dana!  Hey, I've missed you.  Thinking in a linear, rational fashion gets so old and boring.  :D  Plus, I haven't had the chance to use the words "loopy non sequitur" in such a long time. ;D  Welcome back, girlhood!
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: marco on November 17, 2009, 07:23:55 AM
So,this is gonna come out next week,isn't it?
Rohan,are you ready?  :D
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on November 17, 2009, 09:22:03 PM
So,this is gonna come out next week,isn't it?
Rohan,are you ready?  :D

I am ready, Marco. I have been waiting for 2 years.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on November 20, 2009, 12:23:37 PM
Survive and Advance - The Road is hands-down one of the best ever made SPOILER FREE



?The Road? Takes Fresh Approach to Post-Apocalyptic Genre
Ever since God flooded out the entire human race in the early pages of Genesis, literature has abounded with stories of the apocalypse. For generation after generation, from The Book of Revelations to The Stand, we have obsessed over the end of the world, how it will come to pass, and what, if anything, we can do to stop it. Now that humankind has reached a point where the End could conceivably happen in an afternoon, our glimpses into this theoretical future are all the more intriguing. And they?ve never been more important.

The Road, directed by John Hillcoat (The Proposition) and based on the novel by Cormac McCarthy (No Country For Old Men), is a dark, poignant story of a father and son journeying through a post-apocalyptic wasteland, withstanding harsh weather, malnutrition, and under the constant threat of marauders, thieves and cannibals. Their goal is simple: to carry on.

Those looking to sink their teeth into mindless disaster-porn (not that there?s anything wrong with that) can get their fix elsewhere. The Road is a smaller, more penetrating film that draws strength from its intimacy and its ability to do so much with so little.

Viggo Mortensen gives an emotional tour de force as the embattled father; look for him on the red carpet come March. Watching children act is oftentimes painful for me, but I thought Kodi Smit-McPhee was impressive and genuine as the son, and takes on the task of being in literally every scene with rare fearlessness. Charlize Theron, Robert Duvall, and Guy Pearce give small but highly memorable performances, Duvall in particular, whose portrayal of a withered old man journeying all alone will haunt you.

The desolate environment in which the story takes place is itself a character, foreign yet eerily familiar, and so perfectly conceptualized that it matches ? heck, surpasses the standard of realism set by films such as 28 Days Later and Children of Men. Shot throughout four states, including at the site of the Mount St. Helens eruption, Hillcoat and cinematographer Javier Aguirresarobe (The Others, The Sea Inside) paint a backdrop that is altogether beautiful and devastating.

They say that every generation since the dawn of man has feared the End, and while this may be true, not every generation has seen what our modern technology is capable of. The Road is a dark looking glass into our future, and what it is likely to become if our primal nature is left unchecked.

Early in the film, the son looks at his father and asks him, ?We?re the good guys, right?? The father?s response is in the affirmative, but as their situation become increasingly desperate, that sense of morality we think to be ingrained is put to the test. Hillcoat does a masterful job of portraying human beings as what we are and always have been. He holds up a mirror to the world and hypnotizes you with it.

As far as post-apocalyptic movies go, The Road is hands-down one of the best ever made. Despite its raw, gritty facade, which will understandably be a turn-off for many theatergoers, the story underneath has a sense of serenity that everyone can relate to.

The Road opens everywhere on November 25. Need I say more?

Zach Copeland is a Senior Writer for The Film Crusade.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: marco on November 21, 2009, 02:43:33 PM
I hope this comes to the theatres,because here everybody's talking about New Moon and I've heard NOTHING about The Road.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on November 22, 2009, 03:00:37 PM
I hope this comes to the theatres,because here everybody's talking about New Moon and I've heard NOTHING about The Road.

I think it's a wide release on Nov 25th. Where do you live, Marco? And you don't have to worry about people going crazy about New Moon. There is no way to compare THE ROAD with NEW MOON. New Moon has no meaning and I was never interested in the books either. Makes no sense. It just happened to be people liking the story and to me Author Stephanie got lucky.

The Road is different. I don't know if you read the book or not the story is teaching us something important. The way it is written, directed and performed is way way in high profile than the so called NEW MOON.


Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: marco on November 23, 2009, 04:49:09 AM
I live in Italy.I've read the book (The Road,not New Moon) and I think this movie could be great (again,The Road,not New Moon  ;D).
I'm not worring about pepole going crazy for New Moon,I'm afraid that because of this, maybe people don't give the right attention to an interesting project,so that we could miss it.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on November 23, 2009, 11:14:59 AM
I live in Italy.I've read the book (The Road,not New Moon) and I think this movie could be great (again,The Road,not New Moon  ;D).
I'm not worring about pepole going crazy for New Moon,I'm afraid that because of this, maybe people don't give the right attention to an interesting project,so that we could miss it.

I know what you mean. The New Moon didn't beat the THE DARK KNIGHT record which is cool. Even though many people don't watch THE ROAD, at least it is a perfect movie made and has a strong message. Few of the critics stated while praising the film that many people might walk out during the movie, for its graphic images, destroyed cities, blood and canibalism.

Do you remember that part in the book, BABY on the SPIT? - I wanted that scene in the movie, but they are saying it's not in the movie at all. Too graphic.



Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on November 23, 2009, 09:11:36 PM
Soundtrack

http://www.cinematical.com/2009/11/23/exclusive-title-track-for-the-road-soundtrack/
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: marco on November 24, 2009, 06:51:02 AM
Yeah,I remember that.I have to say that I'm glad it's not in the movie,because it's too brutal.I think they don't have to push on the way of graphic violence,they dont' need that,because the whole atmosphere is strong enough to make you understand what's going on.The atmosphere is the key of this movie,and it seems they have focused on it quite well.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on November 24, 2009, 12:05:08 PM
Yeah,I remember that.I have to say that I'm glad it's not in the movie,because it's too brutal.I think they don't have to push on the way of graphic violence,they dont' need that,because the whole atmosphere is strong enough to make you understand what's going on.The atmosphere is the key of this movie,and it seems they have focused on it quite well.

I want to see that scene baby on the spit. :-), but Ihave to agree with you, Marco. The way Cormac described the brutality and destruction is so poetic and real that I pictured in my mind while I was reading the book. BABY on the SPIT is haunting part of the novel. Every review I read that spoiled it for everyone critics mentioned the brutality, graphic violence of the movie. I will watch the movie tomorrow at 7pm showing. Only one theatre in silicon valley, CA is showing the movie. Nov 25th is select theatres date. It will expand later during the week and december all over I think.

Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: marco on November 24, 2009, 12:22:31 PM


Only one theatre in silicon valley, CA is showing the movie




That's what I was talking about.
I'm afraid of a too big "New Moon"-hype.I've seen no commercial for The Road.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on November 26, 2009, 12:34:45 AM
Finally I watched this movie. A great adaptation. Carmac McCathy's every single discription in the novel is on the screen pretty much. An awesome film making achievement. An unforgettable performance by Viggo Mortensen. The film deserves an Academ Award, so does Viggo. Rest of the cast are remarkable. Remarkable locations, cinematography, soundtrack. It is indeed bleak as the novel, yet a very important film of the year. I recommend watching this film.

I don't have the words to describe how perfectly this movie is directed, written for screen and performed.

Hats to the crew and cast.

Rohan
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: the_sorcerer on November 26, 2009, 10:21:18 AM
Finally I watched this movie. A great adaptation. Carmac McCathy's every single discription in the novel is on the screen pretty much. An awesome film making achievement. An unforgettable performance by Viggo Mortensen. The film deserves an Academ Award, so does Viggo. Rest of the cast are remarkable. Remarkable locations, cinematography, soundtrack. It is indeed bleak as the novel, yet a very important film of the year. I recommend watching this film.

I don't have the words to describe how perfectly this movie is directed, written for screen and performed.

Hats to the crew and cast.

Rohan

I cannot believe you're talking about cinematography for THIS film! haha OF COURSE it's gonna look good...OF COURSE Viggo was awesome...OF COURSE it's gonna win a bunch of awards...those are all things I expected going into the film. What I didn't expect, however, was one of the most emotionally involved, heartwrenching film experiences of my life!!! A couple times I was almost brought to tears, then the film BRILLIANTLY changes tone before we're allowed to let loose. The film NEVER lets us stick with an emotion. I've never read the novel but I most likely will now.

Oh, and with that out of the way, I agree with you Rohan...one of the most beautiful films ever caught on celluloid!
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: the_sorcerer on November 26, 2009, 10:24:47 AM
BTW Rohan, you're the first person I heard about this film from, so thank you!  ;D
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on November 26, 2009, 05:39:06 PM
You're welcome Sorcerer. I cried when I read the book the first time. My eyes felt the hot tears coming out after the ending and how it was ended. Then I waited for the movie almost two and a half years. This was important to me cause I wanted to see the same characters on the screen this time who made me cried when I was reading the book.

Viggo's performance is unforgettable. So sad, emotional, powerful, dark, scary and beautiful.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on November 26, 2009, 10:49:32 PM
Ebert changes his review from **1/2 to ***1/2

http://rogerebert.suntimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20091124/REVIEWS/911249990

"Flashback scenes star Charlize Theron as the wife and mother of the two in earlier, sunnier days. These sequences show the marriage as failing, and these memories haunt The Man. I'm not sure what relevance this subplot has to the film as a whole; a marriage happy or sad -- isn't it much the same in this new world? It has a lot of relevance, however, to The Man and The Boy. In times of utter devastation, memories are what we cling to"


The above red text is the from Ebert's review. I read that specific paragraph twice. Either I am confused or Ebert is. Is he making any sense at all? Ebert states that he isn't sure what relevance this subplot has to the film. A MARRIAGE HAPPY OR SAD. -- And he also states isn't it much the same in this new world? I think the subplot has lots of relevance to the marriage. It is not failing, but the mother have to make her decision of leaving the man and the boy behind and advices them to travel south. Not a failing marriage, but the world has failed in the tale of Cormac McCarthy. There are families that committed suicide in numbers from young to old. Did they failed as well? No, they committed suicide out of desperation and to avoid starvation.

And I agree with that it has a lot of relevance to The Man and The Boy. The man remembers how she had to leave them. They loved each other. She even wanted to die with them. Her marriage wasn't failing at all.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Namaste on November 27, 2009, 11:00:59 PM
I hope I can find the film locally.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on November 28, 2009, 02:22:26 PM
I hope I can find the film locally.

It must be playing near you somewhere, Namaste. Did you checked all the listings from theatres near you?
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on November 30, 2009, 06:53:16 PM
Very good review.

http://mcneilmatinee.blogspot.com/2009/11/review-road-12.html
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on December 17, 2009, 11:48:46 AM
Expanding tomorrow 12/18/09 everywhere. Almost everywhere. This is the darkest and most depressing movie I have seen. Reading the book first was different. It made me to think that how much this world is valuable to us and everything in it.

Watching the movie is like a documentary of two people how hard they are trying to survive. It is an ultimate story of surviving, yet told and filmed in a different manner. What is important here is really fragile and meaningful even though the things we never appreciated is taking their last breath in the story, but one important thing still exists and that's love and kindness.

MOVE ON. Time waits for no one. Ending is classically written and classically filmed. What saddens me is the end that how director John Hillcoat filmed it. It saying - that okay let's move on now. Its in the nature of us humans to endure the harsh times and learn from our mistakes. I don't know if the characters know anything about GOD or even care about the God or religion.

The book or the movie is not preachy. It's not preaching us, yet leaves it for us audience to use our brains that this is how the world can come to an end. World means us the people. The race of human and all living things. Vegetation is ending, there is no sun anymore, it's cold, rainy, eathquakes, people are turned to cannibalism, the sea is black. The man and The boy reaches nowhere. It is a tale that we think WE ARE GONNA SURVIVE THIS. As a reader myself I thought my character will reach somewhere so there is hope and second chance for them to live. The road to nowhere I felt at the end and it makes sense. Nowhere has left. Everywhere is nowhere. Lot's of writers are afraid to talk about death, but Cormac McCarthy is not afraid to discuss death and I am not afrait to read about death.

I don't know if you are going to be entertained. I don't know if you are going to take the scenes and I don't know if you will agree with the writer.

Whether it wins the award or not. It is a very good work of art. Perfectly directed and performed. It goes in the books as one of the best films of all time.

I recommend watch it once even though you are not eager to watch it.





Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on December 31, 2009, 12:18:48 PM
A VERY INTERESTING TAKE ON 'THE ROAD' **Spoilers** but it's important how its discbribed and why its important.

John Hillcoat?s film of Cormac McCarthy?s widely-praised novel (adapted for the screen by Joe Penhall) presents what may well be one of the bleakest and most terrifying stories ever told on the big screen. THE ROAD follows the harrowing post-apocalyptic journey of a father and son, named simply ?Man? and ?Boy? (played by Viggo Mortensen and Kodi Smit-McPhee, respectively). The nature of the apocalypse is never described (nor does the novel explain it any more clearly than the film), but there is neither vegetation nor animals, and the landscape is covered in grey ash. It?s perpetually cloudy or raining, and bitterly cold. People are filthy and hollow-eyed, with ashen skin and torn fingernails, starving, homeless. The Man and the Boy are traveling on foot, pushing their meager belongings in a cart, heading vaguely south, determined to avoid another northern winter. They?re on foot not only because there is so little fuel and the roads are littered with abandoned cars and wrecked semis, but also because being on foot lets them hide easily, and in this post-disaster landscape, kindness and compassion have vanished as surely as apple blossoms and pizza.

Charlize Theron appears in flashback sequences; she is the ?Woman? to Man and Boy, a wife and mother who gives birth the same night that the world turns upside down. After a few years, during which, we must assume, food has become scarce and daily existence has become dangerous, she determines that suicide is the only way out for her family. She says that eventually ?they? (referring to the apparently-ubiquitous roving bands of murderous thugs: martial law gone real, real bad) will hunt them down, rape her, rape her son, and then kill and eat all three of them. Learning her husband has onlytwo bullets left, she is furious that this plan can?t work, and walks off into the night, alone, after telling her husband to travel south, as they can?t survive another winter where they are. The Man tearfully begs her to stay, but she refuses, emotionless and resigned to her decision. She clearly doesn?t want to die a victim, and yet it?s almost implausible that she could avoid such a fate. The Man has occasional dreams of her, lit with soft, golden light, full of the warm colors that have been drained out of the world in which he now lives.

For this world is a decidedly brutal one: early on the Man and the Boy meet a band of thugs traveling on a big truck, checking abandoned cars for fuel, searching for food. They try to hide but are discovered (by Garret Dillahunt, one of a number of fine actors in memorable cameos in this two-character story). With the Man?s gun trained on him, the thug offers to bring them along, says they have food, but his cracked, desperate smile and rotted teeth reveal he?s lying. He is the first of a number of bloodthirsty mercenaries the Man and Boy encounter. One terrifying sequence brings them to a seemingly deserted farmhouse that turns out to be a stronghold for a group of ruddy-faced villains who spend their days hunting. The signs are vague but unmistakable in the snowy yard: human skulls on spikes, an iron hook, freshly-split wood, a huge black cooking pot, and a pool of blood in varying shades of red, suggesting a series of slaughters over time.

It seems the primary danger in this cowardly new world is cannibalism, and the Boy understands this only too well; perhaps it?s why he?s quicker than his father to share their food with solitary strangers they meet (including Robert Duvall as an elderly, near-blind man shuffling along in shoes crafted of cardboard and plastic). Despite the Man?s insistence that they?re ?the good guys? because they would never eat people, he nevertheless is slow to show compassion to others, believing his ?every man for himself? approach is the only thing that will keep them alive. But keep them alive for what? There seems to be no imaginable future for them. Even a fortuitous discovery of an enormous cache of packaged foods doesn?t last. Their clothing is not sufficient to keep them warm; thieves take their survival necessities, and even if they reach the coast, it?s not clear anything will improve.

The Man has made it clear he?ll use his remaining bullet on the Boy to save him from a fate worse than fratricide; and the Boy realizes his father?s wracking cough is a harbinger of his uncertain future, when he?ll have to fend for himself. Of course, the Man is trying to give the Boy survival skills for this inevitability; but distrust and brutality don?t come naturally to a ten-year-old, even one who has been raised in a world as cruel and perilous as this one. THE ROAD suggests that human nature will adapt to anything, even the dissolution of humanity.

The film offers an ending that is perhaps more hopeful and redemptive than audiences should expect. But this brief respite from so much relentless brutality and despair cannot erase THE ROAD?s unforgettable imagery and indelible messages. It?s been said that starvation instills desperate behavior in humans. But the cannibalism of this post-apocalyptic world is not the drastic, apologetic action of a Donner Pass traveler. People in this post-disaster world seem to be steeped in aggressive cruelty and selfishness. Or, perhaps, those who still remain are so, because the compassionate and gentle were sacrificed long ago. Dreary weather, massive destruction and pillaging are nothing compared to the savagery of rape, murder, and cannibalism, and these atrocities pervade McCarthy?s vision of our possible future. If the loss of botanical beauty is heartbreaking, then seeing women and children sodomized and eaten is soul-breaking. It?s hard to see how any spiritual belief system could persist in such a world; but the Man talks of God to his Boy, and also sees his son as a god. Is it that the Boy?s innocence makes him holy? Or that blind faith in a once-powerful, all-forgiving deity is the only flicker of light in an utterly dark existence? When the everyday becomes unbearable, the survivors understandably see the beatific in the banal.

Is THE ROAD?s vision of the future plausible? It might be difficult to find an adult who has not contemplated what might happen were it all to come crashing down on us. Our world is full of nukes and chemical weapons and super-germs. One carefully-planned act of biological warfare would easily decimate the population, and one good natural disaster could shut down the pipeline of food and fuel to the world?s largest cities. We could be screwed almost instantly, and FEMA might well leave us, you?ll pardon the expression, high and dry. Cataclysm comes in many forms, and even in a wealthy, cushy country like the United States, our post 9/11, apr?s-Katrina mindset has made disaster a plausible reality. It flashes through our minds every time we stock up on food for a winter storm, or hoard bottled water and batteries during hurricane season.

I?ve often wondered how our lives might look without the constant crutch of accessible personal technology, and how society would break down if it were taken away. What if we really had to fend for ourselves, forage for food, avoid thugs on a daily basis? Maybe some of us have even wondered what clothing we?d wear to venture out into that endless night, what weapons we?d carry, if any, what we?d do if confronted with our own imminent mortality, our humanity erased by the swift evil that descends in the wake of having our comforts and loved ones whisked away in the blink of an eye. Of course, some people in the world already live like this. THE ROAD is a murky harbinger of our future, but perhaps more urgently, a cautionary tale clearly reflecting our present.

Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Mr_Glass.1 on January 13, 2010, 03:42:59 PM
I've read the book, the book was excellent.  I really want to see the movie, but it's not showing anywhere near me.  I'm really annoyed about that.
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on January 15, 2010, 12:54:44 PM
I've read the book, the book was excellent.  I really want to see the movie, but it's not showing anywhere near me.  I'm really annoyed about that.

I don't know why Weinstein's did that with THE ROAD?
Title: Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
Post by: Rohan on May 06, 2010, 07:41:13 PM
The Road on DVD/Blu-Ray MAY 25th.