The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.


Author Topic: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.  (Read 52483 times)

Rohan

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Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
« Reply #180 on: November 26, 2009, 12:34:45 AM »
Finally I watched this movie. A great adaptation. Carmac McCathy's every single discription in the novel is on the screen pretty much. An awesome film making achievement. An unforgettable performance by Viggo Mortensen. The film deserves an Academ Award, so does Viggo. Rest of the cast are remarkable. Remarkable locations, cinematography, soundtrack. It is indeed bleak as the novel, yet a very important film of the year. I recommend watching this film.

I don't have the words to describe how perfectly this movie is directed, written for screen and performed.

Hats to the crew and cast.

Rohan

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Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
« Reply #181 on: November 26, 2009, 10:21:18 AM »
Finally I watched this movie. A great adaptation. Carmac McCathy's every single discription in the novel is on the screen pretty much. An awesome film making achievement. An unforgettable performance by Viggo Mortensen. The film deserves an Academ Award, so does Viggo. Rest of the cast are remarkable. Remarkable locations, cinematography, soundtrack. It is indeed bleak as the novel, yet a very important film of the year. I recommend watching this film.

I don't have the words to describe how perfectly this movie is directed, written for screen and performed.

Hats to the crew and cast.

Rohan

I cannot believe you're talking about cinematography for THIS film! haha OF COURSE it's gonna look good...OF COURSE Viggo was awesome...OF COURSE it's gonna win a bunch of awards...those are all things I expected going into the film. What I didn't expect, however, was one of the most emotionally involved, heartwrenching film experiences of my life!!! A couple times I was almost brought to tears, then the film BRILLIANTLY changes tone before we're allowed to let loose. The film NEVER lets us stick with an emotion. I've never read the novel but I most likely will now.

Oh, and with that out of the way, I agree with you Rohan...one of the most beautiful films ever caught on celluloid!

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Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
« Reply #182 on: November 26, 2009, 10:24:47 AM »
BTW Rohan, you're the first person I heard about this film from, so thank you!  ;D

Rohan

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Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
« Reply #183 on: November 26, 2009, 05:39:06 PM »
You're welcome Sorcerer. I cried when I read the book the first time. My eyes felt the hot tears coming out after the ending and how it was ended. Then I waited for the movie almost two and a half years. This was important to me cause I wanted to see the same characters on the screen this time who made me cried when I was reading the book.

Viggo's performance is unforgettable. So sad, emotional, powerful, dark, scary and beautiful.

Rohan

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Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
« Reply #184 on: November 26, 2009, 10:49:32 PM »
Ebert changes his review from **1/2 to ***1/2

http://rogerebert.suntimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20091124/REVIEWS/911249990

"Flashback scenes star Charlize Theron as the wife and mother of the two in earlier, sunnier days. These sequences show the marriage as failing, and these memories haunt The Man. I'm not sure what relevance this subplot has to the film as a whole; a marriage happy or sad -- isn't it much the same in this new world? It has a lot of relevance, however, to The Man and The Boy. In times of utter devastation, memories are what we cling to"


The above red text is the from Ebert's review. I read that specific paragraph twice. Either I am confused or Ebert is. Is he making any sense at all? Ebert states that he isn't sure what relevance this subplot has to the film. A MARRIAGE HAPPY OR SAD. -- And he also states isn't it much the same in this new world? I think the subplot has lots of relevance to the marriage. It is not failing, but the mother have to make her decision of leaving the man and the boy behind and advices them to travel south. Not a failing marriage, but the world has failed in the tale of Cormac McCarthy. There are families that committed suicide in numbers from young to old. Did they failed as well? No, they committed suicide out of desperation and to avoid starvation.

And I agree with that it has a lot of relevance to The Man and The Boy. The man remembers how she had to leave them. They loved each other. She even wanted to die with them. Her marriage wasn't failing at all.

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Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
« Reply #185 on: November 27, 2009, 11:00:59 PM »
I hope I can find the film locally.
See the villain's larger eyes insinuating a just-off-normal perspective on how they see the world? I see signs Lucius Hunt; just not as you see dead people. I am so very happy we saw..each other, and no I will not tell you what color love is. Stop asking.

Rohan

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Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
« Reply #186 on: November 28, 2009, 02:22:26 PM »
I hope I can find the film locally.

It must be playing near you somewhere, Namaste. Did you checked all the listings from theatres near you?

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Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
« Reply #188 on: December 17, 2009, 11:48:46 AM »
Expanding tomorrow 12/18/09 everywhere. Almost everywhere. This is the darkest and most depressing movie I have seen. Reading the book first was different. It made me to think that how much this world is valuable to us and everything in it.

Watching the movie is like a documentary of two people how hard they are trying to survive. It is an ultimate story of surviving, yet told and filmed in a different manner. What is important here is really fragile and meaningful even though the things we never appreciated is taking their last breath in the story, but one important thing still exists and that's love and kindness.

MOVE ON. Time waits for no one. Ending is classically written and classically filmed. What saddens me is the end that how director John Hillcoat filmed it. It saying - that okay let's move on now. Its in the nature of us humans to endure the harsh times and learn from our mistakes. I don't know if the characters know anything about GOD or even care about the God or religion.

The book or the movie is not preachy. It's not preaching us, yet leaves it for us audience to use our brains that this is how the world can come to an end. World means us the people. The race of human and all living things. Vegetation is ending, there is no sun anymore, it's cold, rainy, eathquakes, people are turned to cannibalism, the sea is black. The man and The boy reaches nowhere. It is a tale that we think WE ARE GONNA SURVIVE THIS. As a reader myself I thought my character will reach somewhere so there is hope and second chance for them to live. The road to nowhere I felt at the end and it makes sense. Nowhere has left. Everywhere is nowhere. Lot's of writers are afraid to talk about death, but Cormac McCarthy is not afraid to discuss death and I am not afrait to read about death.

I don't know if you are going to be entertained. I don't know if you are going to take the scenes and I don't know if you will agree with the writer.

Whether it wins the award or not. It is a very good work of art. Perfectly directed and performed. It goes in the books as one of the best films of all time.

I recommend watch it once even though you are not eager to watch it.






Rohan

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Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
« Reply #189 on: December 31, 2009, 12:18:48 PM »
A VERY INTERESTING TAKE ON 'THE ROAD' **Spoilers** but it's important how its discbribed and why its important.

John Hillcoat?s film of Cormac McCarthy?s widely-praised novel (adapted for the screen by Joe Penhall) presents what may well be one of the bleakest and most terrifying stories ever told on the big screen. THE ROAD follows the harrowing post-apocalyptic journey of a father and son, named simply ?Man? and ?Boy? (played by Viggo Mortensen and Kodi Smit-McPhee, respectively). The nature of the apocalypse is never described (nor does the novel explain it any more clearly than the film), but there is neither vegetation nor animals, and the landscape is covered in grey ash. It?s perpetually cloudy or raining, and bitterly cold. People are filthy and hollow-eyed, with ashen skin and torn fingernails, starving, homeless. The Man and the Boy are traveling on foot, pushing their meager belongings in a cart, heading vaguely south, determined to avoid another northern winter. They?re on foot not only because there is so little fuel and the roads are littered with abandoned cars and wrecked semis, but also because being on foot lets them hide easily, and in this post-disaster landscape, kindness and compassion have vanished as surely as apple blossoms and pizza.

Charlize Theron appears in flashback sequences; she is the ?Woman? to Man and Boy, a wife and mother who gives birth the same night that the world turns upside down. After a few years, during which, we must assume, food has become scarce and daily existence has become dangerous, she determines that suicide is the only way out for her family. She says that eventually ?they? (referring to the apparently-ubiquitous roving bands of murderous thugs: martial law gone real, real bad) will hunt them down, rape her, rape her son, and then kill and eat all three of them. Learning her husband has onlytwo bullets left, she is furious that this plan can?t work, and walks off into the night, alone, after telling her husband to travel south, as they can?t survive another winter where they are. The Man tearfully begs her to stay, but she refuses, emotionless and resigned to her decision. She clearly doesn?t want to die a victim, and yet it?s almost implausible that she could avoid such a fate. The Man has occasional dreams of her, lit with soft, golden light, full of the warm colors that have been drained out of the world in which he now lives.

For this world is a decidedly brutal one: early on the Man and the Boy meet a band of thugs traveling on a big truck, checking abandoned cars for fuel, searching for food. They try to hide but are discovered (by Garret Dillahunt, one of a number of fine actors in memorable cameos in this two-character story). With the Man?s gun trained on him, the thug offers to bring them along, says they have food, but his cracked, desperate smile and rotted teeth reveal he?s lying. He is the first of a number of bloodthirsty mercenaries the Man and Boy encounter. One terrifying sequence brings them to a seemingly deserted farmhouse that turns out to be a stronghold for a group of ruddy-faced villains who spend their days hunting. The signs are vague but unmistakable in the snowy yard: human skulls on spikes, an iron hook, freshly-split wood, a huge black cooking pot, and a pool of blood in varying shades of red, suggesting a series of slaughters over time.

It seems the primary danger in this cowardly new world is cannibalism, and the Boy understands this only too well; perhaps it?s why he?s quicker than his father to share their food with solitary strangers they meet (including Robert Duvall as an elderly, near-blind man shuffling along in shoes crafted of cardboard and plastic). Despite the Man?s insistence that they?re ?the good guys? because they would never eat people, he nevertheless is slow to show compassion to others, believing his ?every man for himself? approach is the only thing that will keep them alive. But keep them alive for what? There seems to be no imaginable future for them. Even a fortuitous discovery of an enormous cache of packaged foods doesn?t last. Their clothing is not sufficient to keep them warm; thieves take their survival necessities, and even if they reach the coast, it?s not clear anything will improve.

The Man has made it clear he?ll use his remaining bullet on the Boy to save him from a fate worse than fratricide; and the Boy realizes his father?s wracking cough is a harbinger of his uncertain future, when he?ll have to fend for himself. Of course, the Man is trying to give the Boy survival skills for this inevitability; but distrust and brutality don?t come naturally to a ten-year-old, even one who has been raised in a world as cruel and perilous as this one. THE ROAD suggests that human nature will adapt to anything, even the dissolution of humanity.

The film offers an ending that is perhaps more hopeful and redemptive than audiences should expect. But this brief respite from so much relentless brutality and despair cannot erase THE ROAD?s unforgettable imagery and indelible messages. It?s been said that starvation instills desperate behavior in humans. But the cannibalism of this post-apocalyptic world is not the drastic, apologetic action of a Donner Pass traveler. People in this post-disaster world seem to be steeped in aggressive cruelty and selfishness. Or, perhaps, those who still remain are so, because the compassionate and gentle were sacrificed long ago. Dreary weather, massive destruction and pillaging are nothing compared to the savagery of rape, murder, and cannibalism, and these atrocities pervade McCarthy?s vision of our possible future. If the loss of botanical beauty is heartbreaking, then seeing women and children sodomized and eaten is soul-breaking. It?s hard to see how any spiritual belief system could persist in such a world; but the Man talks of God to his Boy, and also sees his son as a god. Is it that the Boy?s innocence makes him holy? Or that blind faith in a once-powerful, all-forgiving deity is the only flicker of light in an utterly dark existence? When the everyday becomes unbearable, the survivors understandably see the beatific in the banal.

Is THE ROAD?s vision of the future plausible? It might be difficult to find an adult who has not contemplated what might happen were it all to come crashing down on us. Our world is full of nukes and chemical weapons and super-germs. One carefully-planned act of biological warfare would easily decimate the population, and one good natural disaster could shut down the pipeline of food and fuel to the world?s largest cities. We could be screwed almost instantly, and FEMA might well leave us, you?ll pardon the expression, high and dry. Cataclysm comes in many forms, and even in a wealthy, cushy country like the United States, our post 9/11, apr?s-Katrina mindset has made disaster a plausible reality. It flashes through our minds every time we stock up on food for a winter storm, or hoard bottled water and batteries during hurricane season.

I?ve often wondered how our lives might look without the constant crutch of accessible personal technology, and how society would break down if it were taken away. What if we really had to fend for ourselves, forage for food, avoid thugs on a daily basis? Maybe some of us have even wondered what clothing we?d wear to venture out into that endless night, what weapons we?d carry, if any, what we?d do if confronted with our own imminent mortality, our humanity erased by the swift evil that descends in the wake of having our comforts and loved ones whisked away in the blink of an eye. Of course, some people in the world already live like this. THE ROAD is a murky harbinger of our future, but perhaps more urgently, a cautionary tale clearly reflecting our present.


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Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
« Reply #190 on: January 13, 2010, 03:42:59 PM »
I've read the book, the book was excellent.  I really want to see the movie, but it's not showing anywhere near me.  I'm really annoyed about that.
I see the world Lucius Hunt, just not the way you see it.


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Rohan

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Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
« Reply #191 on: January 15, 2010, 12:54:44 PM »
I've read the book, the book was excellent.  I really want to see the movie, but it's not showing anywhere near me.  I'm really annoyed about that.

I don't know why Weinstein's did that with THE ROAD?

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Re: The Road: They are "each the other's world entire.
« Reply #192 on: May 06, 2010, 07:41:13 PM »
The Road on DVD/Blu-Ray MAY 25th.